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Principles 1 – Building Working Cells and Tissues (P1-BWCT)

Building Working Cells and Tissues (BWCT) is an integrated 7-week course taught in early fall that applies key principles of clinically relevant genetics, biochemistry, histology, and physiology to promote an understanding at the molecular level of how cells and tissues are built and organized, how they function, and how dysfunction can lead to disease. These content areas provide the foundation by which learners can gain an understanding of genomics, cell and tissue structure and function, and translational medicine. In addition, the foundational knowledge of BWCT has applications in understanding biomedical research and public health policy and it provides a crucial framework that will support the acquisition of clinical knowledge in all areas of focus.

This block uses interactive lectures, both large and small group case-based discussions, flipped classrooms, simulations, laboratory sessions, and independent learning modules. Students will also experience a number of in-person patient sessions, which allow students to interact with patients with genetic disorders, and their physicians.

Evaluations will test not only knowledge base, but problem-solving skills and the ability to seek and analyze appropriate information. Problem solving will involve clinical, molecular, and quantitative data.

Summative Assessments will be in the form of weekly online quizzes as well as midterm and final exams. There are prep and consolidation questions related to most sessions which reinforce learning. Formative assessments will be done in small group case-based sessions with faculty facilitators.

Upon completion of P1-BWCT, MS1 students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the pervasiveness of genetics, biochemistry, anatomy, cell biology and physiology throughout medicine and apply the important foundational concepts and vocabulary to the larger fields of applied and translational medicine (Physician as Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver, Professional and Person)
  2. Apply foundational human genetics concepts and problem-solving skills related to familial recurrence risks and inheritance, using clinical, molecular and quantitative data (Physician as Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver and Person)
  3. Apply foundational biochemistry concepts and problem-solving skills related to enzyme function, metabolism, and function of cell membranes and proteins in order to understand disease processes and drug targets (Physician as Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver and Person)
  4. Apply foundational cell biology concepts and problem-solving skills related to cellular differentiation, the structure, function and histological morphology of cells and tissues, and how their interrelationships influence, and is influenced by, the extracellular environment (Physician as Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver and Person)
  5. Apply foundational cell physiology concepts and problem-solving skills related to fluid movement, neuronal function and muscle function in order to understand disease processes and drug targets (Physician as Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver and Person)
  6. Apply foundational anatomy and clinical imaging concepts including appropriate and inclusive terminology, principles for organizing body systems, and physical properties of clinical image creation, modalities, and safety. (Physician as Communicator, Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver)
  7. Research and interpret genetic, biochemical, physiologic, histological anatomical and imaging information independently using web-based medical resources and published literature (Physician as Scientist, Clinical Problem Solver, Professional, Healthcare System Navigator and Person)
  8. Explain effectively foundational genetic, biochemical, physiologic, histological, anatomical and imaging concepts to patients, lay-people and co-workers (Physician as Scientist, Communicator, Clinical Problem Solver, Professional, Advocate, Healthcare System Navigator and Person)
  9. Identify the ethical, legal, and social issues related to genetics and medicine, and recognize the stigma connected to sensitive topics (Physician as Scientist, Communicator, Clinical Problem Solver, Professional, Advocate, Healthcare System Navigator and Person)
  10. Introduce principles, methods, and practice of healthcare delivery (health systems science) including introduction to informatics, system thinking, and value-based care, as they relate to clinically relevant genetics, biochemistry, histology, physiology, anatomy and imaging.

Updated JUNE 24 2022 | cjb