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Blood, Immunity, and Infection

The Blood, Immunity, and Infections block presents an integrated view of the blood, the immune system, and the biology of pathogenic microbes. Students will apply this knowledge in conjunction with clinical data to identify important hematological, immunological, and infectious disorders; and to understand the basis for their diagnosis and clinical management.

After the BII course, the MS1 will be able to:

  1. Describe the development of blood cells in the bone marrow and the organization of immune cells in lymphoid organs (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  2. Explain the elements of both the innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic infections (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  3. Describe the relationship of immune mechanisms to pathogenic states such as inflammation, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and transplant rejection (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  4. Explain the immunological basis of vaccination (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  5. List and explain the principal acquired and inherited forms of hematopoietic failure including anemia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia and discuss related clinical syndromes and their treatment (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  6. Describe the morphology, cytogenetic correlates, clinical features, and principles of treatment of principle forms of hematological malignancies, including primary bone marrow malignancies, lymphoid malignancies, and plasma cell disorders (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  7. Discuss the use of blood products and derivatives in transfusion therapy (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  8. Explain the principles of hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation in the treatment of hematological disease (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  9. Describe the principal mechanisms of the hemostatic system, including platelets and the coagulation proteins in normal and pathogenic states (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  10. Discuss pathological thrombotic states and the principles of pharmaceutical intervention in their treatment (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  11. Demonstrate knowledge of the clinically significant viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and helminthic pathogens, and associate them with specific identifying features and with specific disease syndromes (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  12. Recognize significant classes of antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and anthelminthic chemotherapeutic agents, and describe the principles of antimicrobial spectra and resistance (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  13. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic biology of viral and bacterial pathogens, with particular focus on those structures and biochemical mechanisms of the pathogens which constitute targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy, or which enable specific pathogenic strategies (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  14. Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and evolution of viral pandemics
  15. Demonstrate an ability to engage in a process of clinical problem-solving, including the interpretation of hematological and microbiological laboratory data (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  16. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the normal microbial flora in health and disease (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  17. Demonstrate knowledge of the primary modes of transmission of infectious agents and associate them with specific pathogens, as well as with risk factors for infectious disease (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  18. Acquire a framework for understanding strategies employed by pathogens in establishing a locus of infection, replicating, causing host cell damage, and spreading to other sites and/or other hosts. This framework will enable the student to associate the great variety of pathogenic strategies with specific pathogens and understand the basis for infection control policies for contagious diseases (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  19. Formulate tentative differential diagnoses of infectious diseases based on descriptions of patient history, physical examination, laboratory and imaging findings, drawing upon knowledge acquired in the preceding objectives (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  20. Choose among different treatment modalities including appropriate choice and pharmacology of immunomodulators and anti-infectives for the specific disease syndromes diagnosed (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  21. Identify the unique features of the medical interview in infectious disease, including the significance of travel, contact and exposure history, as well as intimate details of personal life (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
  22. Understand the psychological and social implications for the patient who is diagnosed with a stigmatizing or contagious infectious disease and the effect on the patient in context of his/her community (Physician as a Scientist and Clinical Problem Solver)
    Assessment is based on quizzes, in-class polling sessions, small group exercises and exams.

Updated JUNE 24 2022 | cjb