CIPC Blog

Buprenorphine Myths and Realities

Posted On: August 15, 2018 Posted By: Dan Mullin Tags: CIPC, Family Medicine, Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Opioid Epidemic, Primary Care

Buprenorphine Treatment in Primary Care trending up

The opioid epidemic inflicts significant human and economic damage in the United States. A July article in the New England Journal of Medicine by Drs. Sarah Wakeman and Michael Barnett provides a helpful summary of the myths and realities associated with buprenorphine (Suboxone) and the opioid epidemic.

The UMass Center for Integrated Primary Care continues to play an active role in training primary care teams to respond to the needs of patients with Opioid Use Disorder.

Click on the title bar to read the post.

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Recognizing Impermanence

Posted On: July 12, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: CIPC, Dr. Christine Runyan, Impermanence, meditation, Wellness

The word impermanence written on a sandy beach

We all know this word – the property of not lasting or enduring for an indefinite period of time. But what does that really mean with regards to mindfulness and our experiences?

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Reflecting on the MITI Highway

Posted On: July 02, 2018 Posted By: Ali Hall Tags: Empathy, MITI, Motivational Interviewing, Stages of Change

Reflection of the word CHANGE

In the second part of this two-part post, Motivational Interviewing teacher and coach, Ali Hall reflects on how to listen more deeply to those who are struggling to change their behaviors.

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Taking the MITI Highway to Enhance MI Skill Development

Posted On: June 26, 2018 Posted By: Ali Hall Tags: CIPC, Empathy, MITI, Motivational Interviewing, Stages of Change

Chance to Change

There is an internationally recognized tool for measuring the effectiveness of a clinical encounter using Motivational Interviewing and it is called the MITI (Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity).  In this post, Ali Hall, who acts as MI coach in our MI Certificate course reflects on one of the first times she used the MITI--on a patient conversation she herself had with a chronic smoker.

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Smell the Roses--Unplug

Posted On: June 19, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: Dr. Christine Runyan, Family Medicine, Physician Burnout, Practice Improvement, Primary Care, Technology, Unplugging, Wellness

Smart tech

What you think might be fostering connections to others may actually be amplifying your own critical voice or taking you out of the present moment, hijacking your attention away from your physical company.

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The Case for Scribes in Primary Care: A Reflection

Posted On: May 30, 2018 Posted By: Ginny Van Duyne Tags: Family Medicine, Medical Scribes, Wellness

Closeup of female doctor holding patient hand

The Case for Scribes: Reinvigorating the curiosity of a talented family physician.

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Motivational Interviewing and Weight Loss

Posted On: May 22, 2018 Posted By: Dan Mullin, Ellen Endter Tags: CIPC, Motivational Interviewing, Obesity, Primary Care, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Weight Management

It is logical to ask if Motivational Interviewing can be an effective intervention for patients struggling with issues of weight and obesity.  As with any chronic health condition, MI can be helpful, but it is not a cure.  The question to ask is, “What is the target?”

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Obesity in Primary Care - Part 1

Posted On: May 17, 2018 Posted By: Dan Mullin, Ellen Endter Tags: Family Medicine, Obesity, Practice Improvement, Primary Care, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Weight Management, Wellness

Primary care is an appropriate setting for managing many chronic conditions.  Its longitudinal practice of medicine may seem ideal to handle this intractable issue.  But modern PC practices are also fast-paced and mostly limited to brief encounters.  Obesity cannot be cured in a fifteen-minute consult.  

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Opioid Addiction Treatment Project Success

Posted On: April 17, 2018 Posted By: James Anderson Tags: Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Opioid Epidemic, Practice Improvement, Primary Care Behavioral Health

Hands holding pills'

Opioid addiction is a national epidemic.  Effective treatment options exist but are challenging to access, especially for patients who live in remote, rural areas. There is a long history of separation of treatment of addiction and medicine and a disconnect between primary care and treatment for opioid addiction.  Our project has brought evidence-based treatment to a population in great need.  

UMass CIPC recently partnered with an Accountable Care Organization in rural New York, Bassett Healthcare Network, to expand their provision of Medication Assisted Treatment. Our work together began in January of 2017 and was primarily delivered via video conferencing.  This post was written by James Andersen, PhD a former behavioral health fellow at UMMS and a key partner in this collaboration.

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Modeling Self-Care

Posted On: April 10, 2018 Posted By: CIPC, Dan Mullin Tags: Care Teams, Family Medicine, Physician Burnout, Practice Improvement, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Wellness

Van Gogh StarryNightSelf-care and mindfulness techniques help patients cope with lives that leave them exhausted and burnt out. 

PCPs might model that self-care in their own struggles to stay afloat in a punishing healthcare system.

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Restructuring Care vs Personal Resilience?

Posted On: April 03, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan, CIPC Tags: Care Teams, CIPC, Family Medicine, Medical Scribes, Physician Burnout, Practice Improvement, Wellness

VanGogh Wheatfield with Crows

 

This is Part 2 of a 3-part blog on physician burnout.

Medicine boasts a “find it and fix it” (ideally as quickly and as painlessly as possible) mentality. However, changing and fixing systems is as, if not more, complicated than human beings and when things are going wrong, rarely is it one specific fix that can address all the issues. 

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A recent article sparks conversation about burnout

Posted On: March 27, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: Care Teams, CIPC, Dr. Christine Runyan, Family Medicine, Physician Burnout, Practice Improvement, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Team based competencies, Wellness

Despondent looking man in Van Gogh painting

 

Recently, one of our family doctors posted a link to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine about physician burnout, a recently hot topic purporting epidemic levels of physician burnout with not only personal impact but also patient care implications. A nerve was touched. 

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Psychiatry in a Family Medicine Setting

Posted On: March 20, 2018 Posted By: Alan Brown, MD Tags: Care Teams, Family Medicine, Practice Improvement, Psychiatry in Primary Care

JugglerA psychiatrist weighs in--I feel appreciated by my colleagues and patients at the Family Health Center, although I’m not sure folks fully understand what I do (heck, not sure I do either), so I wanted to try to explain a bit more what I am up to when I sit down with a patient.

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Thoughts and Intentions

Posted On: March 16, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: Dr. Christine Runyan, Family Medicine, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Wellness

Molecular Thoughts

Choosing which thoughts to believe and which to be curious about and which to dismiss takes attention and conscious effort. Once we are aware, however, we can gain control over a tendency to passively accept thoughts as truth and begin to shift our reactions to our thoughts.  

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An Interdisciplinary Patient-Centered Approach to OUD

Posted On: January 18, 2018 Posted By: CIPC Tags: Joan Fleishman, PsyD, Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Opioid Epidemic, Team based competencies

Joan Fleishman

One of our recent fellows, Joan Fleishman, PsyD, is the Behavioral Health Clinical and Research Director in the Department of Family Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). She recently co-authored a paper in the Annals of Family Medicine. “Interdisciplinary Management of Opioid Use Disorder in Primary Care” describes a Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) program in the Pacific Northwest. 

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