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CIPC Blog

A behavioral health practitioner reflects on Medication Assisted Treatment and Medications for Opioid Use Disorder

Posted On: October 19, 2020 Posted By: Dan Mullin Tags: Buprenorphine, Clinician Compassion, Empathy, IBH, Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Motivational Interviewing, MOUD, Primary Care, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Suboxone

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CIPC Director, Dan Mullin PsyD, MPH reflects on his role as a behavioral health practitioner in a clinic where Medication Assisted Treatment and Medications for Opioid Use Disorder (MAT/MOUD) are common.  His clinical work is as a BHP in a rural clinic that has a substantial population of individuals and families impacted by substance use.  

Click on title to read the full post.

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Learning to Fly: a journey into teaching and mentoring in IBH

Posted On: June 15, 2020 Posted By: Nelly Burdette Tags: Care Teams, Family Medicine, IBH, Integrated Primary Care Competencies, Mentoring, Practice Facilitation, Practice Improvement, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Team based competencies

Learning to Fly:  a journey into teaching and mentoring in IBH

In the midst of a world-wide pandemic, behavioral health needs have grown to epidemic proportions among many who have no history of mental illness, as well as those who have long experienced mental illness. In an analogy that many have used, it often feels like learning to fly while already in the air. From this perspective, I feel compelled, as a health psychologist trained in integrated care, to consider how mental health clinicians may find innovative ways to use their skills in assisting systems of care that need our guidance most.

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A 10 Minute Compassion Break for Each of Us

Posted On: May 06, 2020 Posted By: Dr. Paula Gardiner Tags: Clinician Burnout, Clinician Compassion, Integrative Medicine, Meditation, Physician Burnout, Stress, Unplugging, Wellness

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The pandemic takes a toll on providers, caregivers, and clinicians who care for those afflicted.  CICP faculty member Dr. Paula Gardiner shares a ten-minute meditation practice that anyone can do to provide some self-compassion. More>

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A plan to improve integrated care

Posted On: September 15, 2019 Posted By: Adrienne A. Williams Tags: Care Teams, CIPC, Family Medicine, Integrated Primary Care Competencies, Practice Improvement, Primary Care, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Team based competencies

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Late this spring the CIPC faculty read with interest a special issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medicals Settings on “The Primary Care Behavioral Health Model of Integration”.  One particular article caught the attention of CIPC Director, Daniel Mullin.  The author, Adrienne A. Williams, PhD discussed in “The Next Step in Integrated Care: Universal Primary Mental Health Providers” the binary view of mental health, either a patient is mentally healthy or is mentally ill.  The author cites examples of how this view reinforces stigma associated with seeking mental health services, even within current integrated care models.

Williams suggests as a solution, a primary mental health provider, “In contrast to the binary view, where some people are seen as needing an MHP and others do not, this model would be similar to the primary care model of health and would involve development of primary mental health providers (PMHPs). These PMHPs would be to mental health care what primary care physicians (PCPs) are to physical health care.”

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Article Highlights IBH Skills for Family Medicine Residents

Posted On: April 09, 2019 Posted By: CIPC, Matt Martin Tags: Delphi method, Entrustable Professional Activities, Family Medicine, Integrated Primary Care Competencies, Primary Care, Residency Curriculum, Residency skills, Team based competencies

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Until now, there has been no list of essential skills for medical residents who are learning about integrated care.  Recently the journal Family Medicine published Essential Skills for Family Medicine Residents Practicing Integrated Behavioral Health: A Delphi StudyLead author, Matt Martin, Ph.D., LMFT has been a colleague of CIPC faculty and generously agreed to be interviewed for this post.  CIPC faculty member Amber Hewitt Cahill is also part of the distinguished team that authored this study.

Click in the title bar to read the post

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Dr. Blount's new book - the next chapters for IBH

Posted On: April 04, 2019 Posted By: Alexander Blount Tags: Care Coordination and Care Management, Care Teams, CIPC, Dr. Alexander Blount, Dr. Sandy Blount, Family Medicine, Practice Improvement, Primary Care, Primary Care Behavioral Health, Team based competencies

FamilyMedicinePapaerChain-tiny.pngOur founding director, Dr. Alexander Blount, guest blogs about his new book, "Patient-Centered Primary Care: Getting From Good to Great". 

Sandy's 1998 volume "Integrated Primary Care: The Future of Medical and Mental Health Collaboration" is one of the foundational texts of the movement to acknowledge the importance of mental health to our physical well-being and to integrate behavioral health care into primary care. Click on the post title to read his blog post explaining how the new volume is the next chapter for IBH.

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All is Lost -- Or is It?

Posted On: February 11, 2019 Posted By: Dr. Hugh Silk Tags: Care Teams, Clinician Burnout, Empathy, Family Medicine, Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Opioid Epidemic, Primary Care, Stress

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Two more patients of mine died this past weekend. Two more on top of two more on top of two more. I have lost more patients in the last three years from opioid deaths than I have lost patients from all causes during my entire career. 

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Beliefs about OUD treatment challenged

Posted On: November 30, 2018 Posted By: CIPC, Dan Mullin, Steve Martin, MD, EdM Tags: Buprenorphine, CIPC, Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Opioid Epidemic, Primary Care, Suboxone

Notes saying, "Limiting Beliefs Are Not Facts"

Might common and widespread practices surrounding Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) actually be harming patients? Steve Martin, MD, EdM, is lead author on a paper recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that examines the evidence.  The findings in the article will form the backbone of a course that will be given to all Massachusetts medical school students.  UMass CIPC is leading the team that will build this critical training.

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Be it Spiritual or Secular, Finding Your Sanctuary

Posted On: October 29, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: Clinician Burnout, Empathy, Sanctuary, Stress, Unplugging, Wellness

Clouds and Rocks at Hermit Island, Maine

Tina Runyan often posts on this blog about wellness and clinician burnout.  This post was prompted by the shootings in the Pittsburgh synagogue.  Read her comments about the concept and reality of sanctuary by clicking on the post title. 

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New Faculty Member Leads with MBSR and Integrative Medical Group Visits

Posted On: October 26, 2018 Posted By: Dr. Paula Gardiner Tags: CIPC, Family Medicine, Integrative Medicine, MBSR, Medical Group Visits, meditation, Practice Improvement, Primary Care, Primary Care Behavioral Health

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New CIPC faculty member, Dr. Paula Gardinar is an advocate of Integrative Medical Group Visits (IMGV).

Seeing patients and families as a group is not new to behavioral health professionals, but it is a more novel approach when the issue being addressed is medical rather than behavioral or a combination of both. 

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Making Skillful Choices About Stress

Posted On: September 24, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: Physician Burnout, Stress, Wellness

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Stress is universal and a part of our everyday lives.  Is all stress harmful? Can we learn to accommodate stress and make more skillful choices about how we respond to this inevitable part of our lives?  

Read what Dr. Runyan wrote to our family medicine residents by clicking on the title.

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Buprenorphine Myths and Realities

Posted On: August 15, 2018 Posted By: Dan Mullin Tags: CIPC, Family Medicine, Medication-Assisted Treatment for OUD, Opioid Epidemic, Primary Care

Buprenorphine Treatment in Primary Care trending up

The opioid epidemic inflicts significant human and economic damage in the United States. A July article in the New England Journal of Medicine by Drs. Sarah Wakeman and Michael Barnett provides a helpful summary of the myths and realities associated with buprenorphine (Suboxone) and the opioid epidemic.

The UMass Center for Integrated Primary Care continues to play an active role in training primary care teams to respond to the needs of patients with Opioid Use Disorder.

Click on the title bar to read the post.

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Recognizing Impermanence

Posted On: July 12, 2018 Posted By: Christine Runyan Tags: CIPC, Dr. Christine Runyan, Impermanence, meditation, Wellness

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We all know this word – the property of not lasting or enduring for an indefinite period of time. But what does that really mean with regards to mindfulness and our experiences?

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Reflecting on the MITI Highway

Posted On: July 02, 2018 Posted By: Ali Hall Tags: Empathy, MITI, Motivational Interviewing, Stages of Change

Reflection of the word CHANGE

In the second part of this two-part post, Motivational Interviewing teacher and coach, Ali Hall reflects on how to listen more deeply to those who are struggling to change their behaviors.

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Taking the MITI Highway to Enhance MI Skill Development

Posted On: June 26, 2018 Posted By: Ali Hall Tags: CIPC, Empathy, MITI, Motivational Interviewing, Stages of Change

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There is an internationally recognized tool for measuring the effectiveness of a clinical encounter using Motivational Interviewing and it is called the MITI (Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity).  In this post, Ali Hall, who acts as MI coach in our MI Certificate course reflects on one of the first times she used the MITI--on a patient conversation she herself had with a chronic smoker.

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