Depression

updated.gif 10/21/2014

GeneSight Clinical Study

The study is trying to see if a genetic test (called GeneSight®) is helpful in guiding clinicians’ selection of medications for depression.

You might be eligible to participate in this study if:

• You are trying or have recently tried a psychiatric medication, and

• Your symptoms of depression are not improving despite at least 6 weeks on the treatment you are receiving, and/or

• You are unable to tolerate the medication and have discontinued it.

 If you would like more information, please call Jessica 774-455-4045.

 Docket # H-00004690

 Contact Chelsea Kosma @ 508-856-5312.


National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Sustaining Remission of Psychotic Depression Study

Patients that are currently suffering from depression with irrational worries are invited to participate in a research study to determine how long people need to stay on an antipsychotic medication after they recover from their symptoms. Study participation will last up to 20 weeks and patients will receive a combination of an antipsychotic medication and an antidepressant medication. Patients must be:

  • 21 to 85 years of age
  • experiencing symptoms of depression with irrational worries
  • not be pregnant

Patients will receive study medication and study-related care at no cost. Qualifying patients will be eligible to participate in 9-month follow-up study. Compensation provided.

Contact Chelsea Kosma @ 508-334-2812.

Docket # H-14207



 Hormones in Pregnancy and Brain Imaging in Postpartum Depression Research Study

Women can be at increased risk of having depression in late pregnancy or after giving birth. The goal of this research is to see if women at increased risk for developing postpartum depression have changes in certain hormone levels during pregnancy which differ from the hormone levels of women who do not become depressed and remain healthy during this time.

This NIH-funded study will monitor for symptoms of depression and anxiety during late pregnancy (2 visits) and after giving birth (3 visits). We also monitor blood hormone levels (each visit) and in the postpartum, participants will have one brain MRI scan done. Total participation is about 4-7 hours.

Participants in this study:

· are 18-40 years old and pregnant

· are either: healthy without mood symptoms OR have some symptoms of depression or anxiety/stress

· plan to give birth at UMass Memorial Medical Center

· are not taking an antidepressant or steroid medication

Participants will receive financial compensation as well study-related evaluations at no cost. Participants who complete the MRI brain scan will also receive a picture of their brain MRI scan.

To learn more, please contact the study doctor, Kristina M. Deligiannidis, M.D. @ 508-856-5928 or study coordinator Vanessa Villamarin @ 774-455-4137.

Docket # H-00001214


 Brain Imaging and Hormone Levels in Postpartum Depression Research Study

Women can be at increased risk of having depression after giving birth. The goal of this research is to see if women who develop postpartum depression have changes in certain hormone levels in the postpartum period which differ from the hormone levels of women who do not become depressed and compare these levels to brain activity.

The one study visit involves assessment of symptoms of depression and anxiety, taking one blood and urine sample and a having a brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) after giving birth.

Participants in this study:

        · are 18-40 years old

        · developed postpartum depression within 12 weeks of delivering their child

        · are not currently taking an antidepressant medication or steroid medication

Participants will receive financial compensation as well as study-related evaluations at no cost.

Contact the research coordinator Vanessa Villamarin @ 774-455-4137 or  by email @ Vanessa.Villamarin@umassmed.edu or Principal Investigator Kristina M. Deligiannidis, M.D. @ 508-856-5928 or by email @ Kristina.Deligiannidis@umassmemorial.org     

Docket # H-14373


back to top