Courses of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

All courses of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences are listed below. Alternatively, you can view courses offered within each program by exploring individual programs of study.

  • Laboratory Rotation (PGSP) | BBS 550

    Programs: Pathway to Graduate Study

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the studentin evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project, gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research.

    Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Every semester

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Professionalism and Research Conduct (PARC) | BBS 601

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, MD/PhD, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This is a required course for all 3rd year Basic Sciences students and all MD/PhD students entering doctoral study but who are not on the CPHR track. The PARC course helps to center our students in areas that are foundational to success in research - responsible data management, management of intellectual property, the ethical use of research subjects, recognizing and resolving conflicts of interest, professionalism in peer review and publishing, engaging mentors and career exploration and planning. The PARC course comprises faculty-led presentations and small group discussions with case studies and workshop material. An on line learning module (CITI training program comprising many case studies) is also included which must be completed before the end of the fall semester. Students required to take the fall PARC course will be block-registered.

    Coordinator: Anthony Carruthers

    Semester Offered: Fall 

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Communicating Science | BBS 602

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course seeks to help prospective scientists in the biological and medical sciences communicate their work effectively, in writing, graphics, and oral presentations. The course teaches how to prepare a research paper using words, statistics, and figures; how to present science to a lay audience; how to write a grant proposal; and how to present orally to scientific peers.

    Coordinator: Philip Zamore

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every fall

  • Foundations in Biomedical Science | BBS 614

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Pathway to Graduate Study, Translational Science

    This problem-based course provides learning opportunities through exploration of multidisciplinary areas of contemporary biomedical research, and creates a forum for practice in the skills required for research.

    Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every fall beginning Fall 2016

  • Using Animals in Biomedical Research | BBS 701

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    It is to the benefit of both science and animals to have a formal understanding of animal needs and animal use in the research environment. The goal of this course is to provide a sufficient appreciation of laboratory animal biology, care, and use to engender better science and enhanced animal welfare. Topics include controversies surrounding animal use in research; choosing an animal model; the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee; normative biology of rodent and non-rodent laboratory animals; diseases and other stressors and their effects on research; humane experimental endpoints and pain and its alleviation. There are also two laboratory sessions.

    Coordinator: Jerald Silverman

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Molecular Evolution | BBS 705

    Programs: Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

    The course will focus on the quantitative study of molecular evolution using sequence and structural data, showing how both classical and novel methods in population genetics, bioinformatics and computational biology can be used to assess the variability in the genomic sequences and make inferences about the underlying processes of natural selection and evolution. The course is primariy aimed at the students interested in quantitative aspects of biology, and may be useful to practicing biologists desiring a deeper understanding of the computational and stastical techniques.

    Coordinator: Konstantin Zeldovich

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Chemical Biology | BBS 715

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

    The course focuses on the use of chemical approaches to answer fundamental questions in biology. Topics include post-translational modifications, chemical synthesis and modification of biopolymers, combinatorial chemistry, chemical genetics, rational drug design, ligand-receptor interactions, and the fundamentals of fluorescence.

    Coordinator: Stephen Miller

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Molecular Biophysics | BBS 716

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

    The goal of this course is to give students a strong foundation in physical principles that underlie the thermodynamic and mechanistic properties of biological macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. In addition to providing theoretical background, lectures and discussion groups will focus on the application of physical chemical principles in contemporary biomedical research. Topics will include spectroscopic and computational approaches to studying protein and nucleic acid structures, thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding, the solution behavior of macromolecules and principles that govern molecular recognition.

    Coordinator: Jill Zitzewitz

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Structural Biology | BBS 717

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

    In this iteration of Structural Biology, we will be concentrating on protein crystallography, but also introducing small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Normally, each week will include a 90 minute lecture, on Tuesdays from 11:00-12:30 in LRB 816 that is supplemented with either a practical laboratory exercise, paper discussion or problem set, whose time and venue will depend upon the activity. The class will end with required participation in the Pymol classes given by Brian Kelch, which will provide students with hands-on experience visualizing protein structures. (The Pymol classes will not fit into the normal lecture schedule.)

    Coordinator: William Royer

    Semester Offered: Spring, odd years

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Regulatory RNA Biology | BBS 718

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

    This advanced topics course will cover current research in the general area of RNA Biology. Topics envisioned may include RNA synthesis, modification and processing pathways, RNA structure, RNA transport and subcellular localization, translational regulation, RNAi and microRNAs, RNA decay, RNA aptamers, RNA catalysts, RNA and early evolution, and RNA as a drug and/or drug target. The format of this course will center around group discussion of papers from the primary literature. Grading will be based on student attendance, performance in presentations and participation in group discussions.

    Course Coordinator: Melissa Moore

    Semester Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Histology and Tumor Pathology | BBS 720

    Programs: Cancer Biology

    The overall goal of the course is to expose students to the pathology of different types of cancers that occur in humans and the methods used for diagnosis, including histology, cytology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and molecular diagnostics. Faculty from the Departments of Pathology and Cancer Biology will teach this course. The course will start with a review of normal tissue histology of all the major organ systems and an overview of diagnostic techniques. The remainder of the course will consist of organ-based lectures in tumor pathology along with a hands-on microscopic review of pathologic tumor samples. The general format of the six-week course will consist of a one-hour lecture followed by a one-hour laboratory session, given three days per week.

    Course Coordinator: Stephen Lyle

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Cell Signal Transduction | BBS 722

    Programs: Cell Biology

    Proper intracellular signaling is critical to cell growth and differentiation, and dysregulation of signal transduction underlies a wide variety of human disorders. This course will examine various signal transduction pathways utilized by eukaryotes. A different pathway will be discussed each week, with special emphasis on the biological role(s) of the pathway in cell growth and function. Research papers highlighting one or more aspects of the signal pathway will be assigned for student presentation.

    Course Coordinator: Stephen Jones

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2013

  • Cancer Biology | BBS 725

    Programs: Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    This course will provide students with a rigorous and comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that will underlie the genesis and progression of human cancers. It will build on the basic science knowledge acquired in the core curriculum and appreciation of the cancer as a disease obtained from Tumor Pathology course. The salient topics to be covered include stem cells, oncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes, tumor-host interactions, invasion, metasisis, and angiogenesis. A major theme of the course will be to integrate the biology of cancer with the clinical behavior of tumors.

    Course Coordinator: Arthur Mercurio

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Principles of Light and Electron Microscopy | BBS 732

    Programs: Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    Principles and application of microscopy in biomedical research for graduate students at all levels. Demonstrations and laboratory exercises will be incorporated into some of the blocks of the instruction. This course is designed to teach the biologist how microscopes work and how to optimize image quality.

    Course Coordinator: Michael Sanderson

    Semester Offered: Spring, odd years

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Cytoskeleton & Disease | BBS 733

    Programs: Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    This course studies the functions of actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton systems in the context of human disease and will be organized as a series of seminars with presentations by students and faculty. Discussions will include how molecular information contributes to diagnosis and treatment of disease and how clinical phenotypes elucidate protein functioning in whole organisms.

    Course Coordinator: Elizabeth Luna

    Semester Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within last two years

  • Molecular Genetics of Bacteria | BBS 733

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Immunology & Microbiology

    The goal of this course is to provide students with the background needed for participation in research involving bacteria. A tutorial format is used with sessions alternating between textbook-based problem solving and the presentation/discussion of papers from current literature. The paper presentation/discussion portion of the course may be taken separately as BBS807, Current Topics in Prokaryotic Genetics. Topics to be covered include: chromosome structure, replication and segregation; mutations and genetic analysis; plasmids; conjugation; transformation; Lytic bacteriophages; Lysogenic bacteriophages; transposition and site-specific recombination; homologous recombination; DNA repair and mutagenesis; global mechanisms regulating gene expression; and strategies for molecular genetic analysis.

    Course Coordinator: Anthony Poteete

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Nuclear Structure & Function in Disease | BBS 734

    Programs: Cell Biology

    The relationship of nuclear and chromatin structure to gene function and regulation. Topics will be chosen from the recent research literature to illustrate molecular and cellular aspects of nuclear organization and regulation and how defects contribute to human disease. The format includes student presentations and faculty-students discussions of selected research papers.

    Course Coordinator: Anthony Imbalzano

    Semester Offered: Spring, even years

    Last taught: Has not been taught within last two years

  • Human Genetics | BBS 736

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course focuses on the human genetic knowledge and concepts which underlies almost every aspect of human health, both in normal function and disease. We will cover chromosomal, single gene, and multifactorial disorders, including quantitative analysis of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, human cancer genetics, and recent developments in human genome research. Problem solving will involve clinical, molecular and statistical data. We hope to provide a framework for understanding a fast growing and highly technical field, and an appreciation of how current research impacts many aspects of medicine as well as biomedical research. This course follows the Medical School calendar - check with Course Coordinator regarding class schedule.

    Course Coordinator: John Landers

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Mammalian Development and Stem Cells | BBS 737

    Programs: Cell Biology

    The potential of stem cells in therapeutic applications has ignited a fiercely competitive field of research aimed at the isolation, maintenance and differentiation of stem cells into specific pathways of differentiation. The use of stem cells in clinical application, however, requires an understanding of the molecular andcellular and epigenetic events that transform pluripotent cells into differentiated ones. Mammalian embryogenesis can be conceived as a sequence of developmental decisions that result in progressive restriction in cell potency. Because all the cells of a future individual are derived from a single cell, the zygote, the differences between cell types are due to epigenetic events established as the embryo develops. The process for generating these epigenetic marks is equally important for embryogenesis as well as for stem cell research. In this course we will use the cellular and molecular mechanisms of mammalian development as a framework for understanding the origin and differentiation of multiple pluripotent cells and their role in stem cell research and human disease.

    Course Coordinator: Jose Rivera

    Semester Offered: Fall, even years

    Last Taught: Fall 2014

  • Eukaryotic Gene Expression | BBS 738

    Programs: Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    This course encompasses current topics in eukaryotic gene regulation including the study and discussion of current research articles. Course goals are to improve skills in reading, presenting, discussing and critically analyzing research articles and to obtain an up-to-date understanding of some key topics in eukaryotic gene regulation.

    Program Coordinator: Michael Green

    Semester Offered: Spring, even years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Developmental Biology | BBS 739

    Programs: Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    This course will provide basic instruction in contemporary Developmental Biology with an emphasis on animal development.  The course will familiarize students with development in each of the major model systems (worms, flies, frogs, fish, chick, mouse) and expose them to commonly used techniques (genetics, molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry) in the context of animal development. Each topic will be introduced by a lecture and subsequently explored in depth by discussion of relevant articles from the literature.  Each student will be expected to lead at least one group discussion.

    Coordinator: Michael Brodsky

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Has not been taught with past two years

  • Advanced Topics in Bioinformatics | BBS 741

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

    The Adanced Topics in Bioinformatics course covers several important areas of modern bioinformatics and computational biology. The course is aimed not only at students specializing in bioinformatics, but also general biology students who would like to utilize bioinformatics tools in their daily research. The course will begin with an overview of modern sources of bioinformatics data, including high-throughput sequencing and microarrays, followed by a thorough presentation of sequence search and alignment algorithms, and the structure of the eukaryotic genome. Next, we will introduce population genetics - spanning from molecular phylogenetics to natural selection, with an emphasis on analyzing genomic datasets. The biophysical section of the course will include discussions of protein structure and folding, as well as the physical architecture of the genome in vivo, and the relations between sequences and structures for proteins and DNA. The course will include 10 lectures, followed by work on individual or group research projects, presented in lieu of the final exam.

    Course Coordinator: Zhiping Weng

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Stimulus-Secretion Coupling: An Exo(cyto)tic Point Of View | BBS 746

    Programs: Neuroscience

    This course deals with one of the "hottest" topics in not only Neuroscience but in cell biology: Stimulus secretion coupling, i.e., the transduction of signals from the environment into exocytotic responses. We will be studying this process in a number of organisms: viruses, yeast, drosophila, worms, mice, and even humans. Examples include sperm fertilization of eggs, neuronal development, immunologoical defense, hormonal release by endocrine cells and synaptic transmission in the brain. This field utilizes a broad synthesis of "cutting edge" techniques including molecular biology, biophysics, imaging and electrophysiology. Students will be expected to read original papers and present them in order to learn to evaulate their scientific contributions to an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying stimulus-secretion coupling.

    Course Coordinator: Jose Lemos

    Semester Offered: Spring, odd years

    Last Semester Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Introduction to cellular metabolism and disease | BBS 748

    Programs: Interdisciplinary, Pathway to Graduate Study, Translational Science

    This intense 3-week course will expose students to a variety of topics related to cellular metabolism. The course will cover material ranging from foundational principles to current leading-edge research. The principles and mechanisms regulating metabolism will be explored from multiple perspectives – biochemistry, biophysics, genetics, molecular biology and cell biology.

    Course Coordinator: Brian Lewis

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Infection and Immune Response | BBS 755

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Infectious disease is among the strongest agents of natural selection, and adaptations constituting the armament of pathogens and the defense of the host involve many of the most fascinating mechanisms in biology. This course presents a modern view of the fundamental biology of bacterial and viral disease in the context of molecular mechanisms of host defense. A detailed knowledge of cellular and molecular components of the immune system will be integrated with current understanding of microbial virulence strategies, to provide a working understanding of biological mechanisms important in health and disease. The course is organized as three integrated sections focusing on the fields of immunology, bacterial pathogenesis, and virology. Students will obtain a background for advanced course work in each of these disciplines. We will focus on three themes; (1) basic properties of microbes and the innate and adaptive immune defenses that have evolved to respond to them, (2) the interplay - in both dynamic and evolutionary sense - between host defenses and microbial virulence, and (3) the mechanisms of pathogenesis during infection. Comparative clinical and epidemiological pictures of selected diseases will be presented, and will serve as a framework for development of key molecular, cellular, and physiological concepts. Students taking this course will be eligible to continue advanced studies in either the IVP or MGM programs.

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Introduction to Immunology | BBS 755a

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is the immunology component of BBS 755 - Infection and Immune Response.

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Introduction to Bacteriology | BBS 755b

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is the bacteriology component of BBS 755 - Infection and Immune Response

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Introduction to Virology | BBS 755c

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is the virology component of BBS 755 - Infection and Immune Response

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Introduction to Neuroscience | BBS 760

    Programs: Neuroscience

    This course gives an overview of the fundamental principles of molecular, cellular, developmental and integrated neuroscience, including state-of-the-art experimental approaches. Required for all students in the Neuroscience Program. Optional advanced topics course for students in other programs.

    Course Coordinator: David Weaver

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Molecular Biology of Cell Cycle | BBS 761

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    This course covers genetic, biochemical and cellular mechanisms of cell cycle control. Topics include genetic screens for cell cycle regulators, cell cycle checkpoints, cell cycle regulation of DNA replication and chromosome structure, and the cell cycle in development and cancer.

    Course Coordinator: Nicholas Rhind

    Semester Offered: Spring, odd years

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Genetic Systems | BBS 762

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    This course will focus on critical analysis of genetic model systems for the study of numerous biological processes. The course will consist primarily of critical reading and discussion of research articles.  Drosophila and C.elegans genetics will be a major thrust of the course, but other eukaryotic genetic systems will also be included.  A final project will consist of a written and oral scientific proposal.

    Coordinator: Michael Brodsky

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • DNA Repair and Genome Stability | BBS 763

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary

    This lecture/paper discussion course focuses on mechanisms by which cells protect their genomes from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage using examples from the molecular to the cellular and from bacteria to humans. Lectures on a specific topic are followed by a discussion of recent papers from the literature. Lecturers are drawn from several departments to ensure a multidisciplinary approach.

    Course Coordinator: Michael Volkert

    Semester Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Advanced Topics Neuroscience | BBS 781

    Programs: Neuroscience

    These advanced topics courses offer in-depth instruction on cutting-edge research in contemporary Neuroscience.

    Course Coordinator: David Weaver

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Bases of Brain Disease | BBS 782

    Programs: Neuroscience

    This advanced topics course will be an in-depth study of specific areas of the neurochemical, anatomical, cell biological and genetic basis of nervous system disease. It will teach students skills in critically reading, literature and presentation of research material. The course topics are divided into sections covering disorders of neuronal migration and development, neurodegenerative diseases, and behavioral disorders. These topics cover the cell and molecular biological processes of brain function in health and disease.

    Course Coordinator: Zuoshang Xu and Claudio Punzo

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2014

  • Genetic Basis of Behavior | BBS 783

    Programs: Neuroscience

    The genetics of behavior represents a focal point in contemporary neuroscience research. Genetic screens have been conducted to identify mutants affecting behavior in model systems, and this has converged with advances in understanding the neurobiological basis of behavior. This course will synthesize the state of the art regarding genetic basis of behavior in model organisms (worms, flies and mice), including discussion of learning and memory, circadian rhythms, and social behaviors. Lectures will include description of systems for identifying mutations, genes that have been identified, and how identification of these genes contributes to understanding the underlying neural mechanisms of behavior. The course format will include faculty lectures, student presentations and discussion of assigned readings.

    Course Coordinator: Yang Xiang

    Semester Offered: Fall, even years

    Last Taught: Fall 2014

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Neural Development | BBS 784

    Programs: Neuroscience

    The nervous system is the most complex tissue in the human body. The formation and maintenance of this amazing structure entails sophisticated mechanisms that drive the specification of appropriate cell fates in along the spatial and temporal axes, and the formation and fine-tuning of highly specific cell-cell contacts which are crucial for the organism to properly comprehend and manipulate its environment. In this course, students will present and discuss seminal papers that have unveiled important molecular and cellular aspects of nervous system development. Topics covered will include cell fate specification of neurons and glia, neuronal and glial differentiation, axon guidance, synaptogenesis and the fine tuning of the neural circuits through apoptosis and neurite pruning. Over the course of these studies, the students will gain an understanding of the fundamental mechanism that are used to build nervous systems and the insights provided by model organisms.

    Course Coordinator: Marc Freeman

    Course Offered: Fall, off years

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Quantitative Informatics in Biology and Medicine | BBS 785

    Programs: Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Translational Science

    The goal of this course is to introduce GSBS graduate students to the informatics approaches spanning bioinformatics to medical informatics and epidemiology. The course is structured in 5 week sections covering fundamentals of bioinformatics, applications of bioinformatics and genomics, and clinical research informatics.

    Course Coordinator: Jeffrey Bailey

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within 

  • Molecular Basis of Disease | BBS 786

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Translational Science

    The objective of this course is to introduce GSBS graduate students to approaches used to understand the molecular causes of representative diseases and application of such knowledge toward the design and implementation of rational therapies. The course is divided into five-week sections covering neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic diseases. Interspersed among these topics will be guest speakers who will discuss specific aspects of the drug design process and novel approaches to therapy, including gene-, RNA-, and cell-based interventions. Class discussions will also help prepare students to participate effectively in team-oriented translational science. Pairs of students will each write a research proposal addressing a disease mechanism or therapy development of interest and defend the proposal during the last two weeks of class.

    Course Coordinator: Pranoti Mandrekar

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology | BBS 787

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    Advanced course, lecture and discussion, recent information of stem cell biololgy, tissue regeneration, and potential therapeutics

    Course Coordinator: Yicktung (Tony) Ip

    Course Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught withing past two years

  • Disruption of Cellular Architecture and Human Disease | BBS 788

    Programs: Cell Biology

    This course explores the relationships between basic cellular structures, components and processes, from the membrane through the cytoplasm and into the nucleus, and human diseases. Topics will be chosen from the recent literature to illustrate molecular and cellular aspects of cellular architecture and how defects contribute to disease. The format includes introductions by faculty, student presentations and faculty-student discussions of selected research papers. Topically, this course covers diseases ranging from ciliopathies, cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophies, mental retardation, dimentia, hematopoietic diseases to cancer and aging.

    Course Coordinator: Hong Zhang

    Course Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2014

  • RNA Biology Journal Club | BBS 801

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    A discussion of recent and classical papers covering various topics in RNA biology. Students will choose from a list of papers provided by course coordinators or from recent literature with approval from coordinators.

    Course Coordinator: Victor Ambros

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Current Topics In Aging | BBS 803

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    This is a journal club offered every two weeks to discuss papers on aging and genomic stablity. The topics will be mechanisms of aging; with a focus on genetics. The objectives are to cover a large number of papers that identify genes that act to promote or limit life span and theories of aging.

    Course Coordinator: Heidi Tissenbaum

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Fall 2014

  • Genome Biology Journal Club | BBS 804

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    Papers published in high-profile journals relating to systems biology, genomics, chromosome structure and gene expression are discussed. Each participant is required to present one paper and to participate in other paper discussions.

    Course Coordinator: Marian Walhout

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2013

  • Journal Club in Neuroscience | BBS 808

    Programs: Neuroscience

    Neuroscience Journal Club gives students the opportunity to present and discuss exciting new papers in neuroscience in an informal setting. Presentations occur weekly. Students are also expected to attend the Neuroscience Program Seminar series and to meet with external speakers. Program in Neuroscience students must take 2 semesters of BBS808.

    Course Coordinator: Paul Dobner

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Fal

  • Bioinformatics Basics: Sequence Analysis Bootcamp | BBS 809

    Programs: Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

    This is a six-week, one-credit course that will consist of a series of lectures on Unix , R language and bioinformatics tools for molecular biologists. The main goal is to introduce the audience to the basics of the bioinformatics of deep sequencing data analysis. No prior computer or programming skills are required to follow the lectures. This bootcamp starts with a quick introduction to the Unix environment. Then genomic databases and file formats will be discussed. Then usage of Galaxy, a graphical user interface for bioinformatics tools, will be demonstrated. This is followed by the basics of RNA-Seq data analysis and visualizing RNA-Seq data. The last part of this bootcamp is on statistical analysis. A brief introduction to R programming language is followed by statistical tools and methods for RNA-Seq data analysis. Performance on assignments (problem sets) will determine the course grade.

    Course Coordinator: Manuel Garber

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Graduate Student Seminar Series | BBS 810

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

    This course provides students with the opportunity to develop public speaking skills necessary for scientific presentations. This experience will facilitate both formal and informal presentation of a students’ own research. All BMP students will be registered in this course to satisfy the annual presentation requirement.

    Course Coordinator: William Kobertz

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: F

  • Seminar in Cell Biology | BBS 811

    Programs: Cell Biology

    Seminar series in Developmental, Cell and Molecular Biology.

    Course Coordinator: Anthony Imbalzano

    Semester Offered: Fall, SPring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Student Research Seminar | BBS 812

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    This course offers students an opportunity to learn scientific information and presentation skills. Students are required to attend the weekly IGP seminar series and to write a short critique on each seminar. The goal is for students to understand the important elements of a successful presentation including style, interaction and organization.

    Course Coordinator: Yicktung (Tony) Ip

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Fall 2014

  • Current Topics in Neuroscience: Visualizing the Brain at Work | BBS 815

    Programs: Biomedical Engineering & Biotechnology, Neuroscience

    Neuroimaging is an area of growing interest among the neuroscience research community and an area of active research here at Umass Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Fruitful neuroimaging research is predicted on fluency with the fundamentals of imaging technology as well as fluency with the neuroscience topics related to the questions being addressed. The Center for Comparatiave Neuroimaging (CCNI) holds this monthly seminar to facilitate this synthesis of information by examining current neuroimaging research. Students wishing to build a more detailed understanding of the challenges and strategies of current neuroimaging research may attend this seminar for credit. Students receiving credit will be required to present a topic of their choosing at a scheduled weekly meeting, and will have the support of the course mentors and CCNI faculty in the preparation of their talk.

    Course Coordinator: Constance Moore

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunology | BBS 821

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Some of the most active areas of current immunology are investigated through the reading and discussion of research papers. Students further develop the ability to pose questions and design experiments to answer them through writing a research proposal. Topics to be covered include: regulation of lineage specification / commitment and antigen receptor gene recombination; mechanisms of immunological tolerance and lymphocyte activation, cellular transactions and their consequences (e.g. APC:T cell); and immune responses in infectious diseases.

    Course Coordinator: Joonsoo Kang

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Advanced Animal Virology | BBS 822

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is a paper reading-based course discussing in depth new findings in animal virology, including viral biochemistry and molecular biology, genetics, oncogenesis, and pathogenesis. The course will be team-taught by UMMS faculty. The course will begin with introductory lectures to provide background for more advanced readings. Students will then cover different specific areas chosen by the professors in detail with paper readings. At the end of the course the students will write a research proposal and present it to the class and faculty. *Course can be taken for 3 credits with proposal and presentation or for 2 credits without proposal.

    Course Coordinator: Abraham Brass

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Advanced Bacterial Pathogenesis | BBS 823

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This course introduces students to cutting-edge topics in bacterial pathogenesis in a class format designed to encourage both critical analysis and concentration on experimental design. By doing so, it will aid students in preparation for qualifying exams. The course meets once/week for 2-1/2 to 3 hours. Depending on class size and on a rotating basis, groups of two or three students lead discussions of selected topics. Presenting students are required to prepare written reviews to focus the discussion. The bulk of class time is devoted to open discussion and critical analysis of the literature under consideration, and constructive criticism of student reviews. Each student develops and presents a research proposal on one of the topics discussed. Students taking the course for 2 credits will not be required to prepare the research proposal. and research plans. Grading is based on written reviews, quality of presentations, and class participation (all students) and on the quality of the research outline (3 credit).

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Course Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Introduction to Flow & Image Cytometry | BBS 832a

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    The emphasis of the course will be an introduction to the practical aspects of Flow and Image Cytometry. As the majority of the GSBS graduates will either rely on or be exposed to data generated from Flow and Image Cytometry, the course will enhance their understanding of the technology, instrumentation skills, applications and interpretation of data. This course will be a hands on, lab-based program emphasizing on Flow and Image Cytometry instrumentation, components, cell sample staining procedures for immunophenotyping, DNA analysis and Image analysis. Students will participate in polychromatic Flow and Image Cytometry experiments and will progress from flow Cytometry analysis to cell sorting.

    Course Coordinator: Richard Konz

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2013

  • Introduction to Flow & Image Cytometry | BBS 832b

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    The emphasis of the course will be an introduction to the practical aspects of Flow and Image Cytometry. As the majority of the GSBS graduates will either rely on or be exposed to data generated from Flow and Image Cytometry, the course will enhance their understanding of the technology, applications and interpretation of data. The course will as well incorporate guest lectures from leaders I the field. Part one will consist of lectures discussing theory, optics, fluorescence characteristics and instrumentation. Part two will progress to cell sorting, complimentary technology such as Confocal microscopy and advanced applications which rely on these novel technologies.

    Course Coodinator: Richard Konz

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2013

  • Immunology & Virology Graduate Student Seminars | BBS 833

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Advanced IVP graduate students present seminars on their thesis research.

    Course Coordinator: Eric Huseby

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Immunobiology and Virology Spring Seminar Series | BBS 834

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Leading researchers present a weekly seminar on a basic or clinical immunology and virology topic. Prior to the seminar, students read papers suggested by the seminar speaker and discuss the papers in class. Following the seminar, graduate students meet with the speaker for a discussion of the formal seminar. This course surveys the most important areas of basic and clinical immunology and virology including, but not limited to, antigen presentation; gene rearrangements; and expression of the genes for antigen receptors, immune tolerance, cytokines, immune cell development, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases, human immune system malignancies and immune response to infectious agents such as viruses, parasites and bacteria.

    Course Coordinator: Francis Chan

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: 

  • Communicating Neuroscience: Learning by Doing | BBS 838

    Programs: Neuroscience

    This course will demonstrate the major elements that distinguish a great presentation, and identify areas in which each student can improve their presentations through peer critiques and self-assessment. Importantly, this class will allow students many opportunities to apply those critiques, and see their skills improve throughout the course. Substitutes for Neuroscience Journal Club.

    Course Coordinator: David Weaver

    Course Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Tutorial in Biochemistry | BBS 841

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

    Individual instruction on selected topics is arranged by student and instructor.

    Course Coordinator: William Kobertz

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2014

  • Educational Outreach to High Schools and Middle Schools | BBS 843

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    Middle and high school educational outreach coordinated through the IGP, Worcester Pipeline, and Regional Science Resource Center. IGP coordinated activities include development of in-class presentations and experiments in collaboration with high school teachers, and one-on-one and small group mentoring of high school science students. The Worcester Pipline Collaborative coordinates a range of programs with the Worcester Public Schools dedicated to educating and challenging minority and/or economically disadvantaged students for success in the health care and science professions. The Regional Science Resource Center at the Worcester Foundation Campus provides lab space, technical support, and materials for area teachers interested in implementing more inquiry-based, student-centered science in all classrooms. Course is not available to GSBS 1st year students. Students need to make an appointment with Dr. Theurkauf to discuss outreach opportunities prior to the start of semester.

    Course Coordinator: William Theurkauf

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Tutorial in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program | BBS 844

    Programs: Interdisciplinary

    Tutorial arranged with individual faculty.

    Course Coordinator: Craig Peterson

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2014

  • Immunology/Virology Summer Tutorial | BBS 846

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This course is designed to help first-year students prepare for the IMP advanced topics courses in the fall, learn how to think critically about articles, and meet senior students in the program. Students in the class will read one primary and one review paper the week before each class. The topic, paper, and review will be chosen by two student mentors. In a brief presentation; the mentors will describe the current state of the field and summarize the review. The class will then discuss the chosen article and critically analyze the positives and negatives of techniques, systems, conclusions, etc.

    Course Coordinator: Neal Silverman

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Tutorial in Neuroscience | BBS 848

    Programs: Neuroscience

    Tutorials offer the opportunity for one student or a small group of students to discuss research in a specific research area, or a series of selected papers, with a faculty member. The small group format allows extensive discussion and interaction. This course number allows faculty and students the flexibility to develop a syllabus of their making. The proposed syllabus must be approved by the Neuroscience Program Director (D. Weaver). Tutorials are arranged with individual faculty members. Students may re-enroll for multiple tutorials.

    Course Coordinator: David Weaver

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Current Topics in Neuroscience: Drug Addiction | BBS 849

    Programs: Neuroscience

    The study of addiction is very appealing to neuroscientists, since aside from the obvious societal and medical impact of this topic, it allows one to cover the breadth of the discipline, from channel and membrance biophysics to psychology. In this reading, which meets weekly for one-half semester, there will be an orientation lecture presented by the instructor, after which students will present and discuss relevant literature.

    Course Coordinator: Andrew Tapper

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Laboratory Rotation | BBS 850

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project, gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research.

    Course Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Taught every Fall and Spring semester

  • Laboratory Rotation | BBS 851

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project, gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research.

    Course Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every Summer

  • BBS Qualifying Exam | BBS 860

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students are required to register for this course in the fall semester of the academic year in which they are to pass their Qualifying Examination.

    Course Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every year 

  • BBS TRAC Meeting | BBS 865

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    All Graduate Students are required to have at least one TRAC meeting each academic year. After passing their Qualifying Examination and selection of their TRAC, students are required to register for this course each fall semester until their Dissertation Advisory Committee is formed.

    Course Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • Pre-Qualifying Research | BBS 870

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course is for students who have selected a Program and Thesis Advisor but who have not yet passed their Qualifying Examination.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Thesis Research | BBS 900

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students register for Thesis Research fall term of year three of the program, after passing the Qualifying Exam.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Graduate Research | BBS 990

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students register for Graduate Research fall term of year four in the PhD Program and will continue to register each semester until they complete all remaining requirements.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Research Assistantship | CTS 550

    Programs: Pathway to Graduate Study

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate ini an on-going research project, gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Advanced Epidemiology & Research Methods | CTS 602A

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation, Pathway to Graduate Study

    Building on basic skills in epidemiology and scientific research methods; this two-semester course will cover research design, sampling, hypothesis development and testing. Students will develop skills in use of clinical and epidemiological databases and national health surveys. In addition, methodological strengths of various quantitative and qualitative techniques and designs will be explored. Students will have problem sets to complete, in addition to assignments to develop original research approaches to specific scientific and clinical questions.

    Prerequisites: CTS605A or equivalent or permission from Course Coordinator

    Course Coordinator: William Jesdale

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Advanced Epidemiology & Research Methods | CTS 602B

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of this class is to learn advanced epidemiologic techniques, to learn how and when to apply them, and to learn to design rigorous epidemiologic studies.  Students will gain experience in reading the primary epidemiologic methods literature. Course objectives will be met through class lecture, class discussion, problem sets, exams, application of selected principles to one research, and the development of a mini-lecture.  

    Prerequisites: CTS602A, CTS603A, CTS603B (co-req)

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Generalized Linear Models | CTS 603A

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course provides an overview of multivariable analysis and advanced analytical strategies for clinical and population health research. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of multivariable modeling in the context of linear, logistic and Poisson regression. Computational lab assignments and two exams will be completed.

    Prerequisites: CTS605A, Introduction to Statistics or permission from Course Coordinator

    Course Coordinator: Sharina Person

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Statistical Methods for Survival and Longitudinal Data Analysis | CTS 603B

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    Course provides a foundation for statistical thinking in clinical and population health research involving time to event data and longitudinal data. Students will learn statistical models used for estimation and inference; understand advanced statistical techniques; and develop modeling strategies and anlysis plans for specific research questions.

    Prerequisites: CTS603A

    Course Coordinator: Stavroula Chrysanthopoulou

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Comprehensive Project | CTS 604

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research

    This course will provide structure and support for students completing their first major evaluation milestone.  Students come to the first day of class with a research study question approved by their mentor and an existing dataset to use to evaluate the study question. Students will develop a manuscript and write it up according to the instructions for authors for the target journal. Students will conduct their own data analysis and will be evaluated on summative competencies expected to be achieved by the end of their first year of CPHR core coursework and research experiences.  Students present their work in an open forum in the form of a 10-15 minute presentation followed by questions and answers. The manuscripts are sent out for review by three faculty.  Students have two weeks to write a rebuttal and prepare a revised manuscript.

    Prerequisites: CTS602A&B, CTS603A&B, CTS702

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics | CTS 605A

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation, Pathway to Graduate Study

    This course reviews basic principles of epidemiology, investigation of disease outbreaks, and the application of various observational and experimental research designs and strategies to clinical, epidemiological, and translational research. Didactic instruction, readings, and problem sets (including lab-based analyses) are utilized to more fully understand epidemics and their causes, as well as various study designs including cross-sectional studies, case-control studies, cohort designs, and randomized clinical trials. Students also will learn how to design surveillance systems and develop and evaluate screening and diagnostic tests. Students are graded on in-class participation and 2 writing assignments (write-up of lab exercise and in-class student presentation). This will be a full semester course with a total of 30 contact hours.

    Course Coordinator:  Stavroula Chrysanthopoulou

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall

  • Grant Writing | CTS 606

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course is designed to familiarize trainees with the grants review process and each of the NIH grant proposal requirements. The course will include detailed overviews of the grant process, participation in several mock proposal review sessions, and completion of each of the written components of a grant including specific aims, background and significance, preliminary studies, and design methods. Students should invoke their mentor in the development of their grant proposal to the extent possible.

    Course Coordinator: Robert Goldberg

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past tow years

  • Biomedical Informatics | CTS 607

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course offers an overview of the field of biomedical informatics. In this course, concepts from computer and information science are combined with current issues in research, training and clinical practice. The course will provide a broad overview of electronic health records, decision support systems, standards, security and confidentiality, evidence-based medicine, information retrieval, bioinformatics, public health informatics, imaging informatics, and consumer health informatics.

    Course Coordinator: Ralph Zotolla

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Team Science | CTS 608

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    Students will learn how to create and sustain cohesive research teams, develop a productive program of research, develop good mentor and mentee relationships, engage in transdisciplinary science, understand the NIH Roadmap, and hear about different forms of clinical and community research from local investigators who conduct it.

    Course Coordinator: Sherry Pagoto

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Design of Clinical Trials | CTS 609

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The course considers the scientific and practical considerations in the design and conduct of observational studies and clinical trials. Topics to be covered include: study designs (cohort studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials), confounding and bias, ethical considerations, patient recruitment and retention, interim analysis and safety monitoring, and analysis and reporting. Course objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, discussion, and development of a proposal in the student’s area of interest.

    Prerequisites: CTS605A or permission from Instructor

    Course Coordinator: Bruce Barton

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Topics in Molecular Medicine | CTS 610

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course covers a variety of current topics centered on specific diseases with a molecular aspect to either diagnosis or treatment. The course is aimed at developing skills necessary for understanding and discovering how changes in gene function can cause human disease. The course includes a series of topics that use inherited disease processes to illustrate the physiological consequences of molecular, celluar, and genetic phenomena. The course emphasizes the acquistion of skills in interpreting scientic literature and synthesizing this knowledge with real-world patient care. In this way, students learn interesting state-of-the-art material while developing skills and expertise in integrative biology and molecular medicine.

    Course Coordinator: John Sullivan

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Scientific Writing | CTS 611

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course teaches students how to develop a peer reviewed scientific manuscript, through the review of elements of style, authorship, and extent of information that needs to be incorporated into a scientific research paper. Students will learn how to develop the elements that go into a successful scientific manuscript, submit an article for peer review and respond to reviewers' concerns. During each session, students will critique the work of others enrolled in the course to obtain hands on experience in the write-up of the introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of a manuscript. This course will also teach students how to put together a successful oral, as well as poster, scientific presentation.

    Course Coordinator: Robert Goldberg

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: 

  • Systematic Review | CTS 701

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of this class is to learn how to conduct a systematic review including developing a question of appropriate scope and clinical relevance, development of abstraction tool, selection of articles, and drafting of all sections of the review including tables and figures. The end product will be a journal style and length systematic review in the topic area of the students’ substantive interest area that is 75% of the way to being ready for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

    Course Coordinator: Robe

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Ethics for Clinical Research | CTS 702

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course is designed to prepare students with basic knowledge of ethics and understanding and addressing problems in the ethical conduct of research and understanding and addresssing scientific misconduct, including fraud, misrepresentation, conflict of interest. The course also addresses authorship guidelines, IRB regulations and UMASS Medical School regulations. Students will also focus on how to design ethical research, evaluating treatment risk, placebo control, ethics of recruitment, dilemmas of informed consent, potential scientific contribution and issues for special populations and conducting research internationally.

    Course Coordinator: Catherine Dube

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Advanced Topics in Determinants of Health | CTS 710

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course will cover advanced topics in population genetics with specific emphasis on psychiatric conditions; gene-environment interactions; GWAs related to genetic predisposition, and epidemiology topics related to behavioral health.  Class sessions will be a combination of discussion, methods, paper reviews, and lab/data analysis.

    Prerequisites: Permission from Instructor

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: 

  • Advanced Topics in Epidemiology | CTS 711

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    Course will cover a focused set of issues in advanced epidemiology such as conducting community based surveillance-based randomized controlled trial. Skills will be developed in the practical and scientific issues as well as analysis plans and presentation of results.

    Prerequisites: CTS602A, CTS602B, CTS603A, CTS603B, or permission from instructor

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Advanced Topics in Biostatistics | CTS 712

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course will cover an advanced topic in Biostatistics (for example, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Survival Analysis, Graphical Information Systems and Spatial statistics). The purpose of the course is to provide students with emersion in one particular area of biostatistics, provding the theoretical background necessary and the practical "hands-on" data analyze experience.

    Prerequisistes: CTS603A & CTS603B or permission from instructor

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2014

  • Advanced Analytical Methods in Health Outcome Studies | CTS 716

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This advanced methods course is focused on learning methods for addressing confounding and bias. The goals for this course are: To become comfortable recognizing and discussing bias and confounding; To gain experience in using a variety of techniques that help in identifying and minimizing bias and confounding; To be able to assess the potential impact of residual bias and confounding on study results. This course is organized as topic lectures followed by applications of the topic. Students independently apply what is introduced in the lecture to their own data and share their learning with classmates.

    Prerequisistes: CTS602A, CTS602B, CTS603A, CTS603B

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Randomized Clinical Trials in Behavorial Medicine Research | CTS 717

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for the student to understand the foundations of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in behavorial medicine research. Topics related to theory, design, implementation, and evaluation of behavioral randomized clinical trials will be discussed. Students will develop a research project where concepts can be applied and practice reviewing behavioral RCTs in the published literature.

    Prerequisites: CTS702 or permission from instructor

    Course Coordinator: Sherry Pagoto

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Epidemiologic and Preventive Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease | CTS 718

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course deals with the application of epidemiologic methods to the study of cardiovascular disease. The course emphasizes the preventive and therapeutic management of coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes. Students will acquire an understanding of recent trends in the magnitude and outcomes associated with these chronic diseases and major clinical trials in the primary and secondary prevention of several of these important chronic diseases.

    Course Coordinator: Robert Goldberg

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Designing and Conducting Health Surveys | CTS 719

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course introduces students to the foundations of survey methods. The course is designed to introduce students to the use of surveys in public health. Self-reported data, collected using various survey methods, are used to estimate behavioral risks, disease prevalence, access to medical care, health literacy, and physical activity. For example, the CDC sponsors The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a telephone survey conducted by U.S. state health departments. The BRFSS provides state-specific information about issues such as asthma, diabetes, health care access, alcohol use, hypertension, obesity, cancer screening, nutrition and physical activity, tobacco use, and more.

    Course Coordinator: Carole Upshur

    Semester Offered: Summer, odd years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Health Literacy in Research & Practice | CTS 720

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course focuses on examining and analyzing the concept of health literacy, with an emphasis on the relationship of health literacy to one’s ability to manage and optimize their health. The association of health literacy to health disparities and health outcomes will be explored. Challenges in conducting health literacy research and challenges inherent in providing quality care to those with limited health literacy will be examined. Evidence based individual and organizational approaches to mitigate the effects of limited health literacy will be addressed.

    Course Coordinator: Nancy Morris

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2015

  • Infectious Disease Epidemiology | CTS 721

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, Immunology & Microbiology, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course is designed to provide a historical perspective on infectious disease epidemiology as a basis for understanding current global health research and programs aimed at disease control, elimination, eradication and extinction. A passing grade will be based on class participation, discussing required readings and a final written (take-home) report.

    Prerequisites: CTS605A or permission from Instructor

    Course Coordinator: Ann Moormann

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Principles of pharmacology | CTS 722

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    Students will learn to a) apply the scientific method and an understanding of the Principles of Pharmacology (pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug metabolism, drug interactions, autonomic nervous system) to the practice of evidence-based medicine; b) apply an understanding of the Principles of Pharmacology in the making of treatment decisions and c) will have the tools to continue life-long learning and self-assessment with respect to the Principles of Pharmacology, including appropriate utilization of pharmaceuticals and prescribing practice.

    Course Coordinator: Charles Sagerstrom

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Cancer Concepts | CTS 723

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course will cover the basic pathophysiology of malignancy, with each concept introduced by or tied back to one or more specific clinical cases. The course will utilize a combination of lectures and small group either precepts, in which students discuss assigned reading with the assistance of a faculty preceptor, or virtual laboratories, in which students will use computer images of the pathology and the 3 dimensional anatomy of malignancy to understand the process at the cellular, tissue, organ and organism levels. In addition, introductions will be provided to the 3 clinical disciplines of oncology and to the epidemiology and societal implications of cancer.

    Course Coordinator: James Liebmann

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2013

  • Measurement and Instrumentation in Clinical Research | CTS 724

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This is an advanced graduate-level course that focuses on measurement theory and the processes of instrument evaluation, refinement and development. This course explores the use of quantitative and qualitative procedures to measure clinically important variables. In addition, emphasis is posited upon the interaction of conceptual, methodological, cultural and pragmatic considerations that are essential to understand when measuring variables among clinical populations.

    Course Coordinator: Carol Bova

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Introduction to the U.S Healthcare System: How Policies and Practice Affect Health | CTS 725

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course provides an in-depth look at the US healthcare system. Students will apply constructs of structure, process, and outcomes of care to understand and evaluating health care quality and cost and learn how health care policies and payment practices impact the accessibility, effectiveness and cost of care.

    Course Coordinator: Robin Clark

    Semester Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Design and Conduct of Studies of Chronic Disease | CTS 726

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The course will discuss fundamental concepts in chronic disease epidemiology, common research methods used in the design and conduct of studies of chronic disease epidemiology, and the application of these methods for the major chronic diseases affecting industrialized countries. Topics will include cardiovascular disease, cancer, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, and lifestyle practices to promote health.

    Prerequisites: CTS605A or permission from Instructor

    Course Coordinator: Robert Goldberg

    Semester Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Use of Existing Population-Based Public Health and Health Care Data | CTS 727

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    Students will become familiar with existing population-based public health, electronic medical record, and claims data. Topics include advantages and disadvantages, complex sampling and weighting, and obtaining limited-access data. Using a population-based dataset, students will develop and implement an analytic plan to answer a research question of their choosing.

    Prerequisites: At least one semester each of epidemiology and biostatistics or permission of the course director

    Course Coordinator: Molly Waring

    Semester Offered: Spring, even years

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Psychiatric Epidemiology | CTS 728

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course will provide students with fundamental knowledge of psychiatric epidemiology. We will cover epidemiological principles specific to psychiatric such as assessment and diagnostic validity in the absense of a gold standard. Students will be given the opportunity to conduct original research and will gain knowledge of particular psychiatric illnesses through student preparation of course presentations.

    Prerequisites: At least one semester each of epidemiology and biostatistics or permission of the course director

    Course Coordinator: Eric Mick

    Semester Offered: Spring, even years

    Last Taught: Spring 2014

  • Social Epidemiology | CTS 729

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    We will cover the main societal causes implicated in affecting the health of human populations, including hierarchy, racism, gender hierarchy, heteronormativity, and ableism. We will focus on methodological approaches to measuring and interpreting these forces and their effects, on both minority and dominant populations.

    Prerequisistes: CTS 605A or permission of the instructor

    Course Coordinator: William Jesdale

    Semester Offered: Spring, even years

    Last Taught: Spring 2014

  • Public Health Genomics | CTS 730

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course provides an in-depth look at the contribution of human genetic variation public health and is aimed at masters and doctoral level students or junior faculty. The course is structured to provide students with the methodological skills required for the study of common and rare genetic variants, an historical perspective through a comprehensive analysis of seminal works in the field, and application of these concepts to available data resources.

    Prerequisites: At least one semester each of epidemiology and biostatistics or permission of course director

    Course Coordinator: Eric Mick

    Semester Taught: Spring, o

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Behavioral Determinants | CTS 731

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of this class is to learn models of disease prevention, multi-level determinants of health behaviors, and major theories of health behavior change and their application to interventions to address major public health problems.

    Course Coordinator: Milagros Rosal

    Semester Offered: Fall, even years

    Last Taught: Fall 2014

  • Qualitative Methods for Health Research | CTS 732

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course examines uses of qualitative methods in mixed-qualitative or mixed-qualitative/quantitative health studies. Essential qualitative research components are explored: study community; theory; rigor; research questions; data collection methods; writing open-ended questions; sampling; data analysis; publishing; and writing proposals. Students apply concepts covered in class by collecting data for written assignments.

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semeter Offered: Spring, odd years

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Pharmacoepidemiology | CTS 733

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of this class is to learn pharmacoepidemiology, including: rigorous methodologic approaches to the measurement of medication exposure, adherence and adverse events; pharmacoepidemiologic study design; choices for pharmacoepidemiology data resources; and the role of quality of life measurements and pharmacoeconomics.

    Prerequisites: CTS 602A or equivalent

    Course Coordinator: Jennifer Tjia

    Semester Offered: Summer, odd years

    Last Taught: Summer 2015

  • Place and Health | CTS 734

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    In this class, we will explore the influence of “place” on population health, including physical environment (e.g. air, water, soil, food), built environment (e.g. neighborhood structure, traffic, green space), social environment (e.g. cohesion, safety, deprivation, segregation), and legal and civic structure (e.g. policy, law, representation). We will also learn to implement (and critique) methodologic approaches that are particularly adapted to understanding how individuals and places interact, specifically multilevel thinking and modeling, and spatial analytic methods.

    Prerequisites: CTS 602A or equivalent

    Course Coordinator: William Jesdale

    Semester Offered: Summer, Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Introduction to Implementation Science: Moving Research into Practice in Healthcare and Community Settings | CTS 735

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This class provides an introduction to what is often referred to as translational, dissemination, or implementation research, as well as the broad field of implementation science. Students will learn about the significance and major initiatives associated with moving research into practice, and will be introduced to conceptual and analytic tools (e.g., theories, frameworks) to support work in this area.

    Course Coordinator: Timothy Hogan

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Conducting Implementation Research: Designing and Executing Studies for Moving Research into Practice in Healthcare and Community Settings | CTS 736

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This class builds on the foundation offered in CTS 735 regarding salient concepts and theories in the field of Implementation Science to examine key issues in the design and conduct of implementation research. Students will learn about prominent study designs that characterize many implementation trials, the important role that formative assessment plays in informing implementation efforts and the issues inherent in identifying and measuring appropriate implementation processes and outcomes.

    Prerequisites: CTS 735 or instructor permission

    Course Coordinator: Timothy Hogan

    Semester Taught: Spring

    Last Taught: NSpring 2016

  • Theory & Skills for Academic Health Educators | CTS 737

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course presents evidence based teaching theories, strategies and skills for individuals interested in the role of faculty in programs preparing students for health professions. Contemporary issues and approaches to educating students with diverse learning needs will be addressed from assessment of learning styles to evaluation of outcomes.  Societal influences on the curriculum development process are highlighted along with strategies for enhancing academic career development.

    Course Coordinator: Maureen Wassef

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Independent Study | CTS 799

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of an independent study elective is to gain in depth knowledge of a specific topic by working closely with a faculty member with expertise in that area. Typically independent studies cover areas not addressed in the core curriculum and advanced topics or other electives. However, the level of effort and objectives for an independent study must be equivalent to a regular 3-credit course. The student and sponsoring faculty member must propose a framework and outcome for the independent study, in the semester prior to the semester in which the student will be enrolled, to the Program Director for prior approval.

    Prerequisites: Permission of Associate Dean for CPHR & Course Coordinator

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Journal Club | CTS 802

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This journal club provides a forum in which students will discuss current articles and be introduced to advanced methods. Through readings, presentations and discussion, wtudents will deepen their understandinng of methods critical for clinical investigation and strengthen their data presentation and writing skills.

    Course Coordinator: Robert Goldberg

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Research Assistantship | CTS 850

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research

    Research rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with the theory, background, concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating projects and areas that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project, gain familiarity with a field of study, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and make an oral presentation on the results of their work.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Research Seminar | CTS 855

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This is an ongoing seminar series offered on a monthly basis throughout the academic year that will be led by individual senior scientists who will discuss their clinical, public health, and translational sciences research. This seminar series will provide trainees with exposure to a wide variety of potential research mentors as well as topic areas to further explore for their thesis research and beyond.

    Course Coordinator: Robert Goldberg

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Written Qualifying Exam | CTS 860A

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research

    This course number is used for students sitting for the written qualifying exam - an evaluation milestone typically conducted in Spring of Year 2 of graduate studies.

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • Oral Qualifying Exam | CTS 860B

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research

    This course number is used for students who will defend their disseration proposal. Students should register for this either in the Spring or Summer of their second year of graduate studies.

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • CTS TRAC Meeting | CTS 865

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    All Graduate Students are required to have a TRAC meeting each academic year in the fall. After passing their Qualifying Exam in January of the second year, and the Thesis Proposal Defense in the Spring or summer of second year, students are required to register for this course each Fall semester until their Dissertation Examination Committee is formed.

    Course Coordinator: Kate Lapane

    Semester Offered: Fall Spring

    Last Taught: Course taught every year

  • Pre-Thesis Research | CTS 870

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course is for students who have selected a Program and Thesis Advisor but who have not yet passed their Qualifying Examination.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Proposal Development Seminar | CTS 875

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    The purpose of this course is to allow students to develop their dissertation proposals in a systematic fashion under faculty guidance. The dissertation proposal will be in the format of an NIH R03 grant proposal, and at the end of the semester the student is expected to have completed the dissertation proposal. As such, the course is designed to walk the student through each of the NIH grant proposal requirements and expectations. The course will include detailed reviews of the grant process, participation in a mock proposal review session and the completion of each of the written grant components. It is expected that students will involve their mentor and 3-member Thesis Research Advisory Committee (TRAC) in making decisions regarding their proposal and receive their input throughout the semester, so that the student will be prepared to defend the proposal soon after the semester is completed. The course will also be useful as an introduction to NIH proposal writing.

    Prerequisistes: CTS702, CTS602A, CTS603A or permission of instructor

    Course Coordinator: Stephenie Lemon

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Thesis Research | CTS 900

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, MS in Clinical Investigation

    Students register for Thesis Research after passing a Qualifying Examination. They will take Thesis Research each semester until they have accumulated 90 credits.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Graduate Research | CTS 990

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research

    Students register for Graduate Research after completing the requisite number of credits to meet graduation requirements. They will take this course each semester until the complete all remaining requirements.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Building Working Cells and Tissues | HSP 500

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    The goals of the course are to: Integrate key principles of biochemistry, physiology, and cell and tissue histology; Advance understanding of molecular structures, interactions and processes that promote and regulate cellular function; Provide students with foundational material for understanding organ structure, physiology and disease states to be covered in subsequent courses.

    Course Coordinator: William Royer, PhD

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Medical Physiology & Histology Part A | HSP 502A

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    The goals of the course are to provide: A study of basic human physiology, which is the biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts; A study of the microscopic anatomy of the cellular organization and structure of individual tissues and organ systems.

    Course Coordinator: Julie Jonassen, PhD

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Medical Physiology & Histology Part B | HSP 502B

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    The goals of the course are to provide: A study of basic human physiology, which is the biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts; A study of the microscopic anatomy of the cellular organization and structure of individual tissues and organ systems.

    Course Coordinator: Julie Jonassen, PhD

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Epidemiology/Biostatistics | HSP 503

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    The primary goal of the course is to provide students with a core set of concepts and skills in epidemiology and biostatistics that are required to critically evaluate the medical literature, important components of evidence-based medicine.

    Course Coordinator: Michael Kneeland, MD

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Academic Achievement Part A | HSP 504A

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    This course includes the following 3 elements: Academic Coaching: Sessions with education specialist and student mentors (3 hours contact/wk – can be in small groups and 1:1 sessions based on students’ needs) to evaluate individual learning styles, adapt/develop study skills, test prep, exam review, error analysis, time management; Group study sessions: (2 hours/wk) – 1 hour student group discussion/preparation; 1 hour with course-specific faculty, alternating weekly; HSPP advisor meetings: (0.5 hours/wk) - individual (one per month) and group meeting (one per month) with HSPP advisors. Specific activity includes rewrite of application/personal statement.

    Course Coordinators: Deborah-Harmon Hines, PhD and Kendall Knight, PhD

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Academic Achievement Part B | HSP 504B

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    This course includes the following 3 elements: Academic Coaching: Sessions with education specialist and student mentors (3 hours contact/wk – can be in small groups and 1:1 sessions based on students’ needs) to evaluate individual learning styles, adapt/develop study skills, test prep, exam review, error analysis, time management; Group study sessions: (2 hours/wk) – 1 hour student group discussion/preparation; 1 hour with course-specific faculty, alternating weekly; HSPP advisor meetings: (0.5 hours/wk) - individual (one per month) and group meeting (one per month) with HSPP advisors. Specific activities include MCAT prep, interview skills.

    Course Coordinators: Deborah-Harmon Hines, PhD and Kendall Knight, PhD

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Clinical Medicine | HSP 505

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    This is 2 credit shadowing experience in outpatient and inpatient settings, shadowing a physician and other team members – approximately seven 3-hour clinical sessions; assigned reading of 2 novels and other appropriate readings with small group discussions on becoming a physician and the US healthcare system and related assignments and presentations to the class.

    Course Coordinator: Maria Garcia, PhD, MPH

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Clinical Immersion | HSP 506

    Programs: Health Sciences Preparatory

    Immersion in research or community project that allows students to learn and apply basic biostatistics knowledge and prepare for the spring Epi/Biostats core course; fall will be focused on engaging in the experience with limited small group sessions; spring will involve less engagement with immersion site with a focus on writing and presenting work.

    Course Coordinator: Sharina Person, PhD

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Developing Solutions To Research Problems A - Year One | MDP 740A

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Course Goals: The goal for the course is to engage MD-PhD students in the critical thinking skills required to perform biomedical research, in a manner that enables their intellectual contribution to the University’s academic and research functions. The course will examine specific questions of relevance in medicine, and explore how these questions are addressed from multiple scientific perspectives, (e.g. epidemiological, population based, animal model research, cellular and molecular mechanisms). The course will be mostly based on critical analysis of primary literature. Faculty will provide brief background material in the form of lectures, to enable analysis of the primary research papers. Students will discuss papers in small teams and within the whole group. Each section will culminate with the presentation by students of an original research proposal on the specific question being studied.

    Learning Objectives Upon completion of this course, the MD-PhD students should be able to:

    • Distinguish different approaches used to answer biomedical research questions (e.g. epidemiological, population-based, animal models, cellular and molecular mechanisms).
    • Understand the basic elements of study design in epidemiological and population based studies.
    • Understand the basic elements of study design in animal models
    • Understand some of the basic elements underlying cellular and molecular mechanistic studies.
    • Learn to design rigorous studies at different levels of complexity.
    • Define medically relevant questions of individual interest, which will inform choice of summer research rotations and Thesis research.

    Curricular Expectations

    • Students will attend all scheduled sessions
    • Students will have carefully read and analyzed pre-assigned material
    • Students will actively participate in discussion of primary research papers
    • Students will be a substantial contributor within the team to the design and presentation of an original research proposal at the end of each trimester

    Course Coordinator: Silvia Corvera

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: This course is taught every year

  • Developing Solutions To Research Problems B - Year Two | MDP 740B

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Course Goals: The goal for the course is to expose MD-PhD students to areas of basic and translational research, and to the knowledge skills necessary to conduct research in these areas in a manner that enables their intellectual contribution to the University’s academic and research functions. To meet this goal, the student will work directly with a selected member of the research faculty for a minimum of one hour per week over the course of the semester (15 hours total). The focus and experimental methodologies of the investigators research will be explored in-depth through analysis of the primary literature and participation in individual and/or group discussion.
    Learning Objectives:
    Upon completion of this course, the MD-PhD students should be able to:
    • Identify papers in the primary research literature that relate to specific questions of biomedical relevance, and explain the basis for their relevance.
    • Assess the general biomedical research area, and the clinical and translational implications of the research activity of specific investigators at this institution.
    • Articulate novel questions related to a specific area of active investigation that could be the basis of a viable thesis project.

    Course Coordinator: Silvia Corvera

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • Developing Solutions To Research Problems C - Year Three | MDP 740C

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Course Goals: The goal for the course is to expose MD-PhD students to areas of basic and translational research, and to the knowledge skills necessary to conduct research in these areas in a manner that enables their intellectual contribution to the University’s academic and research functions. To meet this goal, the student will work directly with a selected member of the research faculty, which can include but is not limited to their PhD thesis mentor, for a minimum of one hour per week over the course of the semester (15 hours total). They will discuss experimental strategies to address questions of basic, clinical, and/or translation importance. These can include, but are not limited to, work that advances the student’s personal research toward publication or presentation.
    Learning Objectives:
    Upon completion of this course, the MD-PhD students should be able to:
    • Propose feasible experimental strategies, including application of appropriate techniques, assessment of potential contingencies and pitfalls, and identification of alternative approaches, for investigation of novel research questions.
    • When presented with two or more reports from the primary literature that reach conflicting conclusions about similar questions, evaluate the evidence and defend the merits of a particular argument. This includes an articulation of the major conclusions from each report, and an identification and evaluation of experiments that support the conclusions.
    • Articulate the contribution of their personal research to knowledge in the broader area of interest.

    Course Coordinator: Silvia Corvera

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • Introducation to Translational Medicine | MDP 741

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Course Goals: The MD/PhD program stresses the importance of clinical involvement throughout the graduate years.  The first goal of this course is to provide students with a continuous link to clinical skills and to familiarize students with different clinical settings.  Sessions should reinforce clinical skills learned from the first two years of the medical curriculum plus the 16 weeks of clerkship in Care of Family and Care of Adults prior to research studies.  The second goal is to introduce clinicians and potential mentors to the MD/PhD students.  The third goal of this section of the course is to ease the transition back to the clinical years of medical school.  Students are encouraged to work with physician scientists that will help them to get hands on experience with the day-to-day work of physician scientists. 

    Curricular Expectations: The students will engage in clinical experiences for a minimum 15 hours in the fall, spring and summer semesters each. The students can round with physicians on the ward services, attend an outpatient clinic, or participate in supervised freestanding clinics in the local area.  They can also participate in a series of monthly, student organized and clinician led seminars*.  Prior to returning to the clerkships, each student working with a designated clinical preceptor, will perform complete interviews, physical examinations, oral presentations, and write ups on hospitalized patients.  Students will be evaluated by their faculty in these skills and a summary report will be generated at the end of the course.

    Students will enter their preceptor hours into the e*Value system using an “on the fly” evaluation form that will include the date, time, term, preceptor and hours.  This information will be provided by the student by the end of each enrollment term.

    The guidelines for a preceptor are as follows:

    . They must be a faculty member at UMass either Full, Associate or Assistant Professor.
    . They cannot be a resident, fellow or visiting scholar.
    . The clinical sessions can take place at any of the hospital or affiliated hospital campuses and local free clinics as long as they are directly supervised by a UMass faculty member.

    Course Coordinator: Silivia Corvera

    Semester Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • MD/PhD HIPAA & OSHA Certification | MDP 742

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Certification module of HIPPA and OSHA that students enrolled in the PhD portion of the program and are required to maintain annually (within the first two weeks GSBS fall semester) each year. This is an online WebCt class which can be accessed by each MD/PhD student registered for this course in PSSA. The scores will be monitored by the MD/PhD Program Administrator durng the student's PhD years.

    Course Coordinator: Anne Michelson

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Course is taught every year

  • Preparation for Thesis Research | MDP 743

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Preparation of MD/PhD students to enter GSBS full time research in fall term after completing 16 weeks of clinical clerkships from May through August prior to GSBS start. This includes meetings with the future PI, literature review and, when scheduling permits, attendance at lab meetings. For students who have not yet selected a PI the requirements are to work with MD/PhD and GSBS leadership to target and meet with potential lab rotation mentors during the summer term.

    Course Coordinator: Silvia Corvera

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • MD/PhD Learning Communities | MDP 744

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Provides information about SoM Learning Communities (LC) including house member lists, Mentor-Mentee assignments, LC student leadership, career planning resources, information for planning clerkships and more. This is important for all the MD/PhD students during both the SoM and GSBS years.

    Course Coordinator: Gyongyi Szabo

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • MD/PhD Seminar | MDP 800

    Programs: MD/PhD

    This seminar series is a semi-monthly event, organized by the MD/PhD students, and participation is required for all years in the program. The seminar assists students in developing communications competency through these presentations. Each session, two upper level graduate students present their research project. A moderator will maintain the 20 minute timeframe and facilitate the discussion.

    Course Coordinator: Anne Michelson

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • MD/PhD Graduate Research for Students Post-Dissertation | MDP 990

    Programs: MD/PhD

    Students enrolled in the MD/PHD Program who have completed their requirements for the PhD degree will register for this GSBS course each semester while completing their School of Medicine requirements. Students enrolled in this course will participate in and assist with the teaching/evaluation of the MDP Seminar course (MDP800). This course is the MD/PhD equivalent of the GSBS course - GR900, Graduate Research. All students must be in good standing in the MD/PhD program to pass.

    Course Coordinator: Anne Michelson

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every year

Showing 1-138 of 138 items

▴ Back To Top
Section Menu To Top