News Makers 2016

- archived News Makers -
  • 01 - 31 - 16

    Harnessing the power of viruses to treat Huntington's disease

    A look at recent developments to engineer AAV vectors to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease, includes comments from Miguel Sena-Esteves, PhD, associate professor of neurology.

    HDBuzz

  • 01 - 31 - 16

    In Search of Forty Winks

    A story about treating insomnia references the five-week Conquering Insomnia program taught by sleep specialist Gregg Jacobs, PhD.

    New Yorker

  • 01 - 28 - 16

    Researchers find link between autism and infectious disease

    Research by Jun R. Huh, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, found that a viral infection during pregnancy can cause  autism-like behaviors in mice by triggering a key immune reaction.

    Boston Business Journal
    MIT News
    Medical News Today

  • 01 - 27 - 16

    Do Viral Infections During Pregnancy Cause Autism?

    Research by Jun R. Huh, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, found that a viral infection during pregnancy can cause  autism-like behaviors in mice by triggering a key immune reaction.

    NewsMax
    Parent Herald
    Health Canal.com
    NewsMedical
    NewsMedical
    The Health Site
    ScienceBlog.com

  • 01 - 27 - 16

    Research into potential probiotic wormer in horses scores federal cash

    Raffi V. Aroian, PhD, professor of molecular medicine, has received funding to explore the potential of a crystal protein produced by a soil-dwelling bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, to kill equine parasites.

    HorseTalk.com
    The Horse

  • 01 - 27 - 16

    What Would Single-Payer Mean for Doctors?

    Katharine London, MS, principal at the Center for Health Law and Economics, describes the benefits and disadvantages of a single-payer health care system.

    MedPage Today

  • 01 - 26 - 16

    New Optogenetic Technology Uses Near-Infrared Light to Turn Immune Cells to Attack Melanoma Tumors

    Gang Han, PhD, assistant professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology, has developed a new optogentic technology that can trigger the immune system to attack cancer cells.

    AZO Optics
    NovusLight
    MedicalXpress

  • 01 - 26 - 16

    Strongest evidence yet of link between indoor tanning and melanoma

    Mary Maloney, MD, professor of medicine, comments on the link between indoor tanning and melanoma.

    NH Voice
    MedPage Today

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    Boston-area researchers achieve insulin-independence in diabetic mice

    Dale Greiner, PhD, the Dr. Eileen L. Berman and Stanley I. Berman Foundation Chair in Biomedical Research and professor of molecular medicine, and colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston University, Harvard University, and Joslin Diabetes Center, have shown in mice with type-1 diabetes that it’s possible to hide insulin-producing beta cells from the immune system.

    Boston Business Journal
    The Health Site

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    Doctors change how they evaluate blood pressure numbers

    Stephen A Martin, MD, associate professor of family medicine & community health; Gerard P. Aurigemma, MD, professor of medicine; and Glenn R. Kershaw, MD, clinical professor medicine, talk about the dangers of high-blood pressure, changes in how physicians treat the disease, and the findings of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) conducted in part at UMMS.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    Dog DNA probed for clues to human psychiatric ills

    Darwin’s Dogs, a project by Elinor Karlsson, PhD, assistant professor of molecular medicine, collects canine DNA from dogs with the hope of using the information as a basis for studies of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and behavioral conditions.

    Nature

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    New ALS Group’s Goal: Finding a New Treatment by 2020

    UMass Medical School is a part of ALS ONE, a partner organization of the ALS Association and ALS Finding a Cure, that aims to bring leading experts in neurology and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis together to find a new ALS treatment.

    ALS News Today

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    Panel Recommends Depression Screening For Women During And After Pregnancy

    Nancy Byatt, DO, MBA, assistant professor of psychiatry and obstetrics & gynecology, weighs in on new recommendations released by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that call for depression screening in adults, notably calling for screening in women both during and after pregnancy.

    WBUR Rabio CommonHealth

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    State lawmakers work to boost long term healthcare and housing for vets

    Janet Fraser Hale, PhD, RN, FNP, told the state legislature’s Committee on Veterans Affairs that better health services for veterans is needed in Massachusetts. According to a UMMS report, many of the long-term health care facilities for veterans are in need of renovations.

    WWLP-TV Springfield

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    Stroke Rounds: Stent Retriever Benefit Solely in Functional Recovery

    Raphael A Carandang, MD, assistant professor of neurology, calls a new stent retriever treatment for stroke patients “the second revolutionary therapeutic breakthrough in acute stroke care in the last 50 years.”

    MedPage Today

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    UMMS Research Says the Body May Be Able to Produce More Calorie-Burning Fat

    New research by Silvia Corvera, MD, the Endowed Chair in Diabetes Research and professor of molecular medicine, explains how beige fat is grown in the body and how it helps to regulate metabolism.

    Boston Magazine

  • 01 - 25 - 16

    WNEU School of Pharmacy Looks Beyond First Graduating Class

    Resident Briana Santaniello, PharmD, MBA, talks about career opportunities available to students with pharmacy degrees.

    BusinessWest.com

  • 01 - 24 - 16

    After Blizzard, snow shoveling linked to deadly heart attacks

    Steven B. Bird, MD, professor of emergency medicine, explains that fitness levels play a large role in heart attacks that are related to snow shoveling.

    CBS This Morning
    Latinos Health

  • 01 - 22 - 16

    Federal grant bolsters Barnstable Drug Court program

    David A. Smelson, PsyD, professor of psychiatry, said a new $1 million grant will provide substance use and mental health services, including dual mental health and addiction therapy, peer support groups, trauma care and vocational and educational support, to about 30 participants who are Cape Cod residents each year. The program is a partnership between the Barnstable Drug Court with UMass Medical School and AdCare Criminal Justice Services.

    Cape Cod Times

  • 01 - 22 - 16

    Searching for a Fix to Unreliable Nutritional Research

    New technology being developed by computer scientists at UMass Lowell will be pilot tested by researchers at UMass Medical School in an effort to improve the lives of obese and overweight patients by helping them more accurately record caloric intake. Yunsheng Ma, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, is the principal investigator on the project at the medical school. Barbara Olendzki, RD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, will act as a clinical collaborator with the team from UMass Lowell.

    MedPage Today

  • 01 - 21 - 16

    What It’s Like to Be a Standardized Patient

    Michele Pugnaire, MD, senior associate dean for educational affairs and professor of family medicine & community health, explains how the standardized patient program is used to teach challenging situations to medical students. 

    Boston Magazine

  • 01 - 19 - 16

    $100K challenge to boost biotech and medical device start-ups

    The University of Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center (M2D2), a joint venture between UMass Lowell and UMass Medical School, announced its fifth annual M2D2 $100K Challenge, a nationwide competition that showcases the innovative ideas of early-stage medical device, diagnostic and biotech companies.

    Worcester Business Journal
    Boston Globe

  • 01 - 19 - 16

    Algonquin to host panel on opioid abuse

    Stephen Martin, MD, assistant professor of family medicine & community health, will speak about opioid abuse at a panel discussion hosted by Algonquin Regional High School.

    Community Advocate

  • 01 - 19 - 16

    Maxim Group Thinks Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics’ Stock is Going to Recover

    Investors gave Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics a favorable rating thanks to an ALS treatment it currently has in Phase 2 clinical trials at UMass Medical School.

    Analysts Ratings

  • 01 - 16 - 16

    Charity runners face fiscal challenges on top of training

    John R. Hayes, vice chancellor for advancement, and Katie D. Friend, community outreach coordinator, talk about the runners who participate in the Boston Marathon to raise money for the ALS Cellucci Fund. Also interviewed for the article is Christopher Benyo, 50, who will push his wife, Denise DiMarzo, 53, in this year’s marathon for the ALS Cellucci Fund. Denise was diagnosed with ALS five years ago.

    Berkshire Eagle

  • 01 - 14 - 16

    Ribbon cut for future VA annex at UMass Medical School

    Chancellor Michael F. Collins and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert A. McDonald unveiled a new 13,000-square-foot specialty care annex at the UMass Medical Science Park that will provide health services to veterans and announced a lease for 15,000 square feet at the Ambulatory Care Center. 

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette
    Worcester News Tonight
    MassLive.com

  • 01 - 14 - 16

    Supportive Stem Cells Safe for ALS

    UMass Medical School will be a site for BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics’ new clinical trial for a stem cell treatment of ALS.

    ALZForum.com

  • 01 - 14 - 16

    UMass Med School team aims to figure out the flu

    In an effort to build a more effective influenza vaccine or treatment, Robert Finberg, MD, chair and professor of medicine, has assembled a team at UMMS funded by $10 million from the Department of Defense to predict how the virus evolves.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 13 - 16

    M2D2 Kicks Off Fifth Annual $100K Challenge

    The University of Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center (M2D2), a joint venture between UMass Lowell and UMass Medical School, announced its fifth annual M2D2 $100K Challenge, a nationwide competition that showcases the innovative ideas of early-stage medical device, diagnostic and biotech companies. 

    Lowell.com

  • 01 - 12 - 16

    Are Google X moon shots aiming disruptive technology at healthcare?

    An article exploring how Google X could disrupt the health care industry includes comments from Peter R. Chai, MD,  instructor of emergency medicine, regarding his latest study about using Google Glass to facilitate remote toxicology consults.

    Computer Business Review

  • 01 - 12 - 16

    Dedicated to finding a cure for ALS

    Robert H. Brown Jr., DPhil, MD, the Leo P. and Theresa M. LaChance Chair in Medical Research and chair and professor of neurology, told the Boston Globe that entrepreneur and  ALS patient Kevin Gosnell has helped put together a collaboration between the major ALS centers in Massachusetts.

    Boston Globe

  • 01 - 11 - 16

    Dog DNA may hold key to curing human diseases

    Darwin’s Dogs, a project by Elinor Karlsson, PhD, assistant professor of molecular medicine, collects canine DNA from dogs with the hope of using the information as a basis for studies of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and behavioral conditions.

    Catholic Free Press

  • 01 - 11 - 16

    Female professors are woefully outnumbered at med schools nationwide

    An article about the number of women holding full professorships at medical schools refers to the UMass Medical School is a leader in the category thanks to a slew of mentoring and programs designed to support career development.

    STAT News

  • 01 - 11 - 16

    UMass facility helping people to master mindfulness

    A story about the benefits and practice of mindfulness talks about the community services offered by the Center for Mindfulness.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 10 - 16

    Can wearable tech help to police – and beat – doping in sport?

    Stephanie Pepper Carreiro, MD, instructor in emergency medicine, explains how wearable technology might be able to detect if an athlete is using performance-enhancing drugs.

    The Guardian

  • 01 - 10 - 16

    Increased opioid addiction feared

    An article about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the use of the narcotic painkiller OxyContin for children as young as 11 years old includes comments from G. Naheed Usmani, MD, associate professor of pediatrics, about how the use of powerful painkillers can benefit children receiving cancer treatments or suffering from life-threatening chronic illnesses.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 10 - 16

    PAG Presentation Describes Dog Model for OCD; Crowdsourcing Study of Dog Behavior Genetics

    Elinor Karlsson, PhD, assistant professor of molecular medicine, discusses her ongoing efforts aimed at using dogs as a model organism for studies of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and behavioral conditions.

    GenomeWeb

  • 01 - 10 - 16

    The message: You're not alone

    Christie J. Langenberg, MD, assistant professor of family medicine and community health, explains what happens when a patient suffers a concussion.

    Fitchburg Sentinel and Enterprise

  • 01 - 08 - 16

    Worcester 13,000-square-foot veterans clinic finished

    Maynard construction management firm J.M. Coull said it has completed work at a new Veterans Administration (VA) Outpatient Clinic located in the UMass Medicine Science Park on the campus of UMass Medical School. The VA and UMMS collaborated in the planning of the clinic, which will offer audiology, podiatry and optometry services to patients.

    Worcester Business Journal

  • 01 - 07 - 16

    Massachusetts, industry team up to help boost digital health companies

    Gov. Charlie Baker's administration on Thursday announced a new initiative to develop the digital health industry in Massachusetts. UMass President Marty Meehan said he envisions UMass Medical School and UMass Memorial Heath Care collaborating with Central Massachusetts businesses and colleges.

    Masslive.com

  • 01 - 07 - 16

    Massachusetts Medical Schools Are Working Together to Fight the Opioid Crisis

    Chancellor Michael F. Collins explains how UMass Medical School updated its curriculum in response to Gov. Charlie Baker’s call for medical schools in Massachusetts to help find solutions to the opioid crisis.

    Boston Magazine

  • 01 - 07 - 16

    15 hospital, health system chief diversity officers to know

    Deborah L. Plummer, PhD, vice chancellor of diversity and inclusion, is listed as one of 15 diversity officers to know in the health care field.

    Becker Hospital Review

  • 01 - 07 - 16

    Lumosity To Pay $2M To Settle Deceptive Ad Allegations

    A story about Lumosity, the online “brain training” memory game, paying $2 million to settle allegations about false advertising includes comments from Sheldon Benjamin, MD, professor of psychiatry, who said that while studies have shown that gaming participants can improve their performance on simple tasks, there is no compelling evidence that games reduce or reverse cognitive decline.

    WBZ News Radio

  • 01 - 06 - 16

    21 fresh faces and bold new ideas from Boston

    A look back at some of most important stories in Boston in 2015 includes MassBiologics’ work to develop a pre-exposure prophylaxis that prevents tick-transmitted infection of Lyme disease, a breakthrough that could lead to seasonal prevention against the most common tick-borne infection in North America.

    Boston Globe

  • 01 - 06 - 16

    EDITORIAL: President Obama's actions on gun sales and safety draw fire from opponents

    An op-ed about President Obama’s executive order to regulate gun sales includes comments from Michael P. Hirsh, MD, professor of pediatric surgery, chief of pediatric surgery & trauma and Worcester’s interim commissioner of public health, as well as Michael Hunter, deputy chief of EMS at UMass Memorial Health Care.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 06 - 16

    Health: Begin new year with journey to sensible nutrition

    A health story about the ineffectiveness of diets references research done by Sherry Pagoto, PhD, associate professor of medicine. 

    The Missoulian

  • 01 - 05 - 16

    3-D in spotlight

    Carolynn DeBenedectis, MD, assistant professor of radiology, explains the benefits 3-D mammography provides over standard digital mammography.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 05 - 16

    Sperm Quality Has Been Declining And Diet May Be To Blame

    A new study by Oliver J. Rando, MD, PhD, professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology, shows that a high fat or low protein die can affect levels of tRNAs fragments in sperm that can regulate expression of gene transcriptions. 

    Huffington Post
    Food Navigator
    The Hindu

  • 01 - 05 - 16

    VRC01 and broadly neutralizing antibodies are increasing options for HIV/AIDS treatments

    A story about research into new treatments for HIV references efforts by Jeremy Luban, MD, the David J. Freelander Professor in AIDS Research and professor of molecular medicine, to use CRISPR/Cas9 to excise HIV from human cells.

    IPWatchDog.com

  • 01 - 04 - 16

    Worcester Area Hospitals’ Emergency Room Waiting Times - Big Differences

    An article about emergency room wait times includes statistics for UMass Memorial Medical Center, HealthAlliance Hospital and Marlborough Hospital.

    Go Local Worcester

  • 01 - 03 - 16

    Children could inherit abnormal metabolisms from overweight fathers

    A new study by Oliver J. Rando, MD, PhD, professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology, shows that a high fat or low protein diet can affect levels of tRNAs fragments in sperm that can regulate expression of gene transcriptions.

    Wired UK

    South China Morning Post

    Inverse

  • 01 - 03 - 16

    The lingering health effects of the Civil War

    A study that links decades of poverty caused by the Civil War with today’s high rate of heart disease in the American south includes comments from Oliver J. Rando, MD, PhD, professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology, about how the diets of parents can affect their children's metabolism in a way that predisposes them to disease.

    Washington Post

  • 01 - 03 - 16

    UMass Lowell, UMMS Launch Secure Health Data System

    New technology being developed by computer scientists at UMass Lowell will be pilot tested by researchers at UMass Medical School in an effort to improve the lives of obese and overweight patients by helping them more accurately record caloric intake. Yunsheng Ma, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, is the principal investigator on the project at the medical school. Barbara Olendzki, RD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, will act as a clinical collaborator with the team from UMass Lowell.

    Health IT Security

  • 01 - 02 - 16

    Monfredo: City Council Adds Restrictions to its Tobacco Ordinance…Congratulations

    An op-ed about new restrictions placed on the use of electronic cigarettes in smoke free locations cites information provided by Tina Grosowsky, project coordinator for the Central MA Tobacco Free Community Partnership.

    Go Local Worcester

  • 01 - 02 - 16

    Study shows disabled women in R.I. receive less medical care

    Monika Mitra, PhD, assistant professor of family medicine and community health, found that women in Rhode Island with disabilities received less medical care and were more likely to experience adverse birth outcomes than typical women.

    Providence Journal

  • 01 - 01 - 16

    As I See It: A city's year in review

    An op-ed by Mayor Joseph M. Petty and City Manager Edward M. Augustus Jr. references UMass Memorial Health Care’s plans to bring 500 jobs to downtown Worcester as part of the revitalization of Front Street.

    Worcester Telegram & Gazette

  • 01 - 01 - 16

    Kratom, an Addict’s Alternative, Is Found to Be Addictive Itself

    Edward Boyer, MD, PhD, professor of emergency medicine, explains how Kratom, a Southeast Asian leaf and natural painkiller sometimes used as a substitute for people coping with heroin addiction, can be just as addictive as opioids.

    New York Times

  • 01 - 01 - 16

    Option for addicts can offer relief, and sometimes a relapse

    Edward Boyer, MD, PhD, professor of emergency medicine, explains how Kratom, a Southeast Asian leaf and natural painkiller sometimes used as a substitute for people coping with heroin addiction, can be just as addictive as opioids.

    The Seattle Times

    Alaska Dispatch News

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