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Matthew Harkey, PhD, ATC

Matt Harkey.jpgMatt Harkey is a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences funded by the Center for Clinical and Translational Science TL1 training grant. Dr. Harkey is a musculoskeletal researcher who specializes in early knee osteoarthritis pathophysiology to understand how physical function and lower-extremity biomechanics are related to structural imaging and biomarker outcomes. Dr. Harkey received an undergraduate degree in Exercise and Sports Science with a concentration in Athletic Training from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After graduation, he worked as a full-time athletic trainer at a local high school to gain hands-on clinical experience by providing injury management and rehabilitation services for primary and secondary school athletes, while simultaneously obtaining a master’s degree in Exercise Science at the University of Toledo. While obtaining a PhD in Human Movement Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill he received unique multi-disciplinary training in biomechanics, physical function, physiology, and cartilage imaging to better understand the development of knee osteoarthritis following lower extremity joint injury. In 2017, Dr. Harkey began a post-doctoral fellowship at Tufts Medical Center that focused on developing a comprehensive knee imaging assessment that quantifies damage in multiple joint structures. Last summer, he transitioned to the TL1 training grant at UMMS mentored by Dr. Kate Lapane to supplement his prior training with novel analytic approaches and advanced epidemiological design. Dr. Harkey’s long-term goal is to be a productive, independent investigator who uses novel analytic strategies in large cohorts to identify the earliest pathogenic signs of knee osteoarthritis by determining the association between markers of early osteoarthritis and clinically oriented measures.