Basic Skills for Working with Smokers

Course Overviews and Learning Objectives (pdficonsmall)

 

1. Module one: The Tobacco Problem and The Public Health Perspective

Overview: Tobacco dependence is the leading cause of illness and death in the United States. Module 1 will provide an overview of the tobacco problem, including a perspective on public health approaches to tobacco control. Finally, we will review the Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guideline on Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence which offers a clinical roadmap on how to best address tobacco use and nicotine dependence within healthcare systems.

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:
1. Discuss the history of tobacco use in the United States.
2. List types of tobacco products and nicotine delivery devices.
3. Describe tobacco use prevalence.
4. Describe the public health model and components of comprehensive tobacco control.
5. Discuss the major recommendations of the Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guideline on Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence.

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2. Module Two: Exploring Barriers and Facilitators to Change

Overview:  Why is it so difficult for a person to stop smoking? Why is it so hard for a provider to intervene with a client/patient who uses tobacco? This module will explore the complex interplay of biological, psychological and social factors that contribute to the initiation and maintenance of tobacco use and make it so hard to change. Social Learning theory and the Stages of Change model will be examined as they relate to tobacco use. Finally, you will be asked to apply this information by completing a brief exercise that assesses a client's stage of change.

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the social learning model of smoking cessation.
2. Discuss the reasons that providers find it difficult to intervene with a person's tobacco use.
3. Define and describe the Stages of Change model as it applies to tobacco use.

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3. Module Three: Understanding Tobacco Use Disorder

Overview: Nicotine dependence is increasingly being recognized as a chronic, relapsing condition similar to that of other addictive substances. Most who use tobacco want to quit but find it difficult because of the addictive nature of tobacco. Clinical approaches to dealing with tobacco should be grounded in a general understanding of addictions and specific approaches to tobacco treatment. This module will provide an overview of nicotine dependence and treatment strategies. We will explore the definition and nature of nicotine dependence, and review the DSM 5 criteria for nicotine dependence. Finally, a brief overview of treatment approaches will be presented.

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the effects of addiction on individuals.
2. Define the key features of nicotine dependence.
3. Outline the various approaches for treating nicotine dependence.
4. Identify and discuss similarities and differences between nicotine dependence and dependence on other substances. 

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4. Module Four: Using Pharmacotherapy to Help Your Clients Quit Smoking

Overview: Correct and appropriate use of pharmacotherapy, such as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) , bupropion (Zyban) or Varenicline (Chantix), can double a person's chances of successfully stopping tobacco use. It is important to understand the biological basis of addiction and how pharmacotherapy can help break the cycle of addiction. This module will provide a brief overview of the actions of nicotine on the brain and the rest of the body, including both physiological and psychological effects. The concepts of tolerance, nicotine regulation and withdrawal will be explored. We will then look at the various types of pharmacotherapy available and present guidelines for proper use. Finally, you will be asked to apply this information to 10 hypothetical clients. 

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the physiological & psychological effects of nicotine.
2. Describe the absorption & distribution of nicotine.
3. List nicotine withdrawal symptoms according to the DSM 5.
4. Describe various types of nicotine replacement therapy available, how they work & general guidelines for use.
5. Explain what bupropion is and how it is to be taken.
6. Explain what varenicline is and how it is to be taken.
7. Apply knowledge of the use of pharmacotherapy to 10 hypothetical clients.

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5. Module Five: Talking with Clients about their Tobacco Use

Overview: In our role as health professionals we are very concerned about the damaging effects that tobacco use has on the health of our clients. We are challenged to find a balance between educating our clients and guiding them as they struggle with the sometimes difficult decision to stop using tobacco. The goal of this module is to present some tools that will help you develop a collaborative relationship with your client. We will focus on how to intervene at all Stages of Change, and how to help a client actively explore their ambivalence about smoking.
A client who is actively working to resolve their ambivalence about tobacco use is more likely to be successful. According to clients, feeling heard and understood are the most important aspects of a helping relationship. You will learn about two counseling styles: Motivational Interviewing and Patient Centered Counseling. Both of these styles incorporate techniques that can help you listen effectively and understand each client’s individual needs. 

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. Identify biopsychosocial factors which impact the tobacco user.
2. Apply the Stages of Change model to clinical examples.
3. Describe the dynamics of ambivalence.
4. Articulate the underlying goals of counseling and the central principles of Motivational Interviewing.
5. Describe the six general principles of Patient Centered Counseling.
6. Describe the concept of cultural competency and why it is a critical component of effective counseling.
 

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6. Module Six: Health Consequences of Smoking

Overview: Tobacco use is responsible for over 400,000 deaths in the US each year, causing 1 out of every 2 smokers to die from a smoking-related disease. In addition, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke causes another (80,000) deaths due to coronary heart disease and lung cancer. This module will review what the health consequences are from smoking, from exposure to second hand smoke, and from other forms of tobacco use.
Tobacco smoke is a toxic mix of more than 7,000 chemicals. Many are poisons. When these chemicals get deep into your body’s tissues, they cause damage. Over time, the damage can lead to disease. The chemicals in tobacco smoke reach your lungs quickly when you inhale. They go quickly from your lungs into your blood. Then the blood flows through your arteries. It carries the chemicals to tissues in all parts of your body. Your lungs, blood vessels, and other delicate tissues become inflamed and damaged when you smoke. 

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. List the leading causes of death in the US.
2. Describe the anatomy, ingredients, and by products of a cigarette, smokeless tobacco, and a cigar.
3. Discuss the effect of tobacco on the various systems of the body.
4. Discuss tobacco effects specific to women/children/infant.
5. Describe the effects of 2nd hand smoke (ETS).
6. List the health benefits of quitting smoking and tobacco use. 

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7. Module Seven: Tobacco control resources & TTS certification information

Overview: This module will review key resources available to tobacco treatment counselors and provide information on the Massachusetts Tobacco Treatment Specialist Training (TTS) and Certification program.

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. List resources available to tobacco treatment specialists.
2. Identify key resources in tobacco control.
3. Describe the Tobacco Treatment Specialist certification process.

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8. Module Eight: Creating an Environment Supportive of Tobacco Treatment Services

Overview: Research has demonstrated that systems-level changes can be effective in increasing quit rates within health care agencies. The Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guideline recommends that every tobacco user be asked about their tobacco use status at every visit and offered assistance in quitting. This module will review the 5A model of brief intervention and look at those components that help institutionalize tobacco treatment. We will explore why something seemingly so simple to do can be so difficult to implement. Participants will develop their own tobacco treatment action plan to take back to their workplace.

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. List the major guidelines available to guide efforts at institutionalizing tobacco treatment services within a healthcare agency.
2. Describe 3 levels of cessation intervention.
3. Name and describe the 5As.
4. Identify methods for creating change within an organizational environment.
5. Complete an action plan to take back to your workplace that will help guide tobacco treatment planning efforts. 

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9. Module Nine: Conducting a thorough intake and assessment interview with a patient who smokes (Required for MassHealth Providers: Optional but Highly Recommended for All Other Providers)

Overview: Conducting a thorough intake and assessment interview with a patient who smokes is an important component of effective treatment planning. This module provides the basic foundation for the use of a 4 page Intake, Assessment and Treatment Planning tool that serves as a guide in working with the patient to assess the physiological, psychological and social aspects of an individual’s tobacco dependence. It is expected that each clinician will amend this tool and its use to best fit his/her practice.

 

Learning Objectives: After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

1. Assess tobacco use from the bio/psycho/social perspective.
2. Identify a patient’s strengths and potential barriers to quitting;
3. Conduct a 45-minute intake and assessment interview which advances the smoker’s stage of change and encourages quitting, and
4. Develop a basic treatment or referral plan based on the assessment. 
 

 

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© 2014 University of Massachusetts Medical School