Sagor receives award for excellence in public service

Pediatrician and public health advocate honored by the Massachusetts Medical Society

By Ellie Castano

UMass Medical School Communications

April 02, 2013
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Linda Sagor, MD, MPH

Linda Sagor, MD, MPH, received the 2013 Henry Ingersoll Bowditch Award for Excellence in Public Health from the Massachusetts Medical Society, the oldest continually operating medical society in the country and publisher of the New England Journal of Medicine. The award is given annually to a Massachusetts physician who has demonstrated outstanding initiative, creativity and leadership in public health outreach and advocacy. Recipients are nominated by their peers in the Massachusetts medical community.

Dr. Sagor, who is clinical professor of pediatrics, established the FaCES (Foster Children Evaluation Services) program at UMMS and UMass Memorial Health Care in 2003 to address the lack of timely health screenings and comprehensive exams for children in foster care, and to improve communication among health care providers, state agencies and foster families. She is currently serving as senior consultant on health care system issues for children in foster care for the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families, where she is developing and implementing a plan (modeled on FaCES) to improve the health care of all children in foster care throughout the commonwealth.

“I am honored that this award recognizes the importance of advocacy for the medical needs of children in foster care, the most vulnerable children in our community,” said Sagor.

In her extensive career as a clinician and public health advocate, Sagor has won numerous awards, including the UMass President’s Public Service Award in 2009 and the Worcester District Medical Society’s Community Clinician of the Year Award, also in 2009.

The Bowditch Award will be presented at the 39th annual Public Health Leadership Forum on April 3.

Related link on UMassMedNow:
Sagor expanding role in keeping foster kids healthy