2014 Press Releases

UMMS Ebola Relief effort launched with $7.5M Paul G. Allen Family Foundation grant

UMMS Ebola Relief effort launched with $7.5M Paul G. Allen Family Foundation grant

With a $7.5 million grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, UMass Medical School will lead a team of academic partners to provide a comprehensive relief effort in Liberia, bringing doctors, nurses and training and medical supplies to the Ebola-stricken country. 

New ALS-associated gene identified using innovative strategy

New ALS-associated gene identified using innovative strategy

A team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with the familial form of the neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.   

NIH awards Schiffer $7.9 million to attack drug resistance

NIH awards Schiffer $7.9 million to attack drug resistance

With a new $7.9 million program project grant from the National Institutes of Health, drug resistance expert Celia Schiffer, PhD, hopes to shift the drug development paradigm by putting resistance first in drug design strategies.

Food addiction: The missing piece in the obesity epidemic

Food addiction: The missing piece in the obesity epidemic

Two UMMS events, the Be Mentally Well community lecture series on Oct. 21 and the first-of-its-kind food addiction conference on Oct. 22, will shed light on the latest science about the biology, diagnosis and treatment of food addiction. 

Tuning light to kill deep cancer tumors

Tuning light to kill deep cancer tumors

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. This promising new treatment strategy could expand the current use of photodynamic therapies to access deep-set cancer tumors.

Rare genetic disease protects against bipolar disorder

Rare genetic disease protects against bipolar disorder

A team of scientists led by researchers at the UMass Medical School and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have identified what is likely a key genetic pathway underlying bipolar disorder, a breakthrough that could lead to better drugs for treating bipolar affective disorder, as well as depression and other related mood disorders. UMMS neurologist and geneticist Edward Ginns, MD, PhD, is lead author on the study. 

Even motivated dieters need close access to healthy food

Even motivated dieters need close access to healthy food

A new study from the UMass Medical School and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health finds that not having close access to healthy foods can discourage even the most motivated dieters. The study by Wenjun Li, PhD, et. al. was published online Oct. 7 by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Rando receives NIH Director’s Pioneer Award for epigenetic inheritance research

Rando receives NIH Director’s Pioneer Award for epigenetic inheritance research

Oliver Rando, MD, PhD, has received one of 10 highly competitive NIH Director’s Pioneer Awards, which challenge investigators to develop groundbreaking approaches in biomedical or behavioral science. Dr. Rando’s project, Role for small RNAs in sperm in control of offspring metabolism, will focus on how a father’s diet can influence the metabolism of his children. 

Hyundai Hope on Wheels grant to advance glioblastoma research at UMMS

Hyundai Hope on Wheels grant to advance glioblastoma research at UMMS

Jack L. Leonard, PhD, received a $250,000 grant from Hyundai Hope on Wheels and Worcester-area Hyundai dealers to explore a tumor suppressing pathway that arrests growth and initiates programmed cell death in glioblastoma tumor cells.

New UMMS study shows medications of questionable benefit used in advanced dementia

New UMMS study shows medications of questionable benefit used in advanced dementia

Nursing home residents with advanced dementia often receive medications of questionable benefit with costly consequences, according to a new study by researchers at UMass Medical School, published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine on Sept. 8.