Immunology & Microbiology Program Courses

The courses listed below inlcude required courses of the core curriculum, research and milestone courses, as well as program specific advanced topics, seminars, journal clubs and tutorials for specialization in Immunology & Microbiology.

  • Professionalism and Research Conduct (PARC) | BBS 601

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, MD/PhD, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This is a required course for all 3rd year Basic Sciences students and all MD/PhD students entering doctoral study but who are not on the CPHR track. The PARC course helps to center our students in areas that are foundational to success in research - responsible data management, management of intellectual property, the ethical use of research subjects, recognizing and resolving conflicts of interest, professionalism in peer review and publishing, engaging mentors and career exploration and planning. The PARC course comprises faculty-led presentations and small group discussions with case studies and workshop material. An on line learning module (CITI training program comprising many case studies) is also included which must be completed before the end of the fall semester. Students required to take the fall PARC course will be block-registered.

    Coordinator: Anthony Carruthers

    Semester Offered: Fall 

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Communicating Science | BBS 602

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course seeks to help prospective scientists in the biological and medical sciences communicate their work effectively, in writing, graphics, and oral presentations. The course teaches how to prepare a research paper using words, statistics, and figures; how to present science to a lay audience; how to write a grant proposal; and how to present orally to scientific peers.

    Coordinator: Philip Zamore

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every fall

  • Foundations in Biomedical Science | BBS 614

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Pathway to Graduate Study, Translational Science

    This problem-based course provides learning opportunities through exploration of multidisciplinary areas of contemporary biomedical research, and creates a forum for practice in the skills required for research.

    Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every fall beginning Fall 2016

  • Using Animals in Biomedical Research | BBS 701

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Translational Science

    It is to the benefit of both science and animals to have a formal understanding of animal needs and animal use in the research environment. The goal of this course is to provide a sufficient appreciation of laboratory animal biology, care, and use to engender better science and enhanced animal welfare. Topics include controversies surrounding animal use in research; choosing an animal model; the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee; normative biology of rodent and non-rodent laboratory animals; diseases and other stressors and their effects on research; humane experimental endpoints and pain and its alleviation. There are also two laboratory sessions.

    Coordinator: Jerald Silverman

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Molecular Genetics of Bacteria | BBS 733

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Immunology & Microbiology

    The goal of this course is to provide students with the background needed for participation in research involving bacteria. A tutorial format is used with sessions alternating between textbook-based problem solving and the presentation/discussion of papers from current literature. The paper presentation/discussion portion of the course may be taken separately as BBS807, Current Topics in Prokaryotic Genetics. Topics to be covered include: chromosome structure, replication and segregation; mutations and genetic analysis; plasmids; conjugation; transformation; Lytic bacteriophages; Lysogenic bacteriophages; transposition and site-specific recombination; homologous recombination; DNA repair and mutagenesis; global mechanisms regulating gene expression; and strategies for molecular genetic analysis.

    Course Coordinator: Anthony Poteete

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Human Genetics | BBS 736

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Translational Science

    This course focuses on the human genetic knowledge and concepts which underlies almost every aspect of human health, both in normal function and disease. We will cover chromosomal, single gene, and multifactorial disorders, including quantitative analysis of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, human cancer genetics, and recent developments in human genome research. Problem solving will involve clinical, molecular and statistical data. We hope to provide a framework for understanding a fast growing and highly technical field, and an appreciation of how current research impacts many aspects of medicine as well as biomedical research. This course follows the Medical School calendar - check with Course Coordinator regarding class schedule.

    Course Coordinator: John Landers

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Infection and Immune Response | BBS 755

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Infectious disease is among the strongest agents of natural selection, and adaptations constituting the armament of pathogens and the defense of the host involve many of the most fascinating mechanisms in biology. This course presents a modern view of the fundamental biology of bacterial and viral disease in the context of molecular mechanisms of host defense. A detailed knowledge of cellular and molecular components of the immune system will be integrated with current understanding of microbial virulence strategies, to provide a working understanding of biological mechanisms important in health and disease. The course is organized as three integrated sections focusing on the fields of immunology, bacterial pathogenesis, and virology. Students will obtain a background for advanced course work in each of these disciplines. We will focus on three themes; (1) basic properties of microbes and the innate and adaptive immune defenses that have evolved to respond to them, (2) the interplay - in both dynamic and evolutionary sense - between host defenses and microbial virulence, and (3) the mechanisms of pathogenesis during infection. Comparative clinical and epidemiological pictures of selected diseases will be presented, and will serve as a framework for development of key molecular, cellular, and physiological concepts. Students taking this course will be eligible to continue advanced studies in either the IVP or MGM programs.

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Introduction to Immunology | BBS 755a

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is the immunology component of BBS 755 - Infection and Immune Response.

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • Introduction to Bacteriology | BBS 755b

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is the bacteriology component of BBS 755 - Infection and Immune Response

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Introduction to Virology | BBS 755c

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is the virology component of BBS 755 - Infection and Immune Response

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Spring 2016

  • DNA Repair and Genome Stability | BBS 763

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary

    This lecture/paper discussion course focuses on mechanisms by which cells protect their genomes from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage using examples from the molecular to the cellular and from bacteria to humans. Lectures on a specific topic are followed by a discussion of recent papers from the literature. Lecturers are drawn from several departments to ensure a multidisciplinary approach.

    Course Coordinator: Michael Volkert

    Semester Offered: Fall, odd years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunology | BBS 821

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Some of the most active areas of current immunology are investigated through the reading and discussion of research papers. Students further develop the ability to pose questions and design experiments to answer them through writing a research proposal. Topics to be covered include: regulation of lineage specification / commitment and antigen receptor gene recombination; mechanisms of immunological tolerance and lymphocyte activation, cellular transactions and their consequences (e.g. APC:T cell); and immune responses in infectious diseases.

    Course Coordinator: Joonsoo Kang

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Advanced Animal Virology | BBS 822

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This is a paper reading-based course discussing in depth new findings in animal virology, including viral biochemistry and molecular biology, genetics, oncogenesis, and pathogenesis. The course will be team-taught by UMMS faculty. The course will begin with introductory lectures to provide background for more advanced readings. Students will then cover different specific areas chosen by the professors in detail with paper readings. At the end of the course the students will write a research proposal and present it to the class and faculty. *Course can be taken for 3 credits with proposal and presentation or for 2 credits without proposal.

    Course Coordinator: Abraham Brass

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Advanced Bacterial Pathogenesis | BBS 823

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This course introduces students to cutting-edge topics in bacterial pathogenesis in a class format designed to encourage both critical analysis and concentration on experimental design. By doing so, it will aid students in preparation for qualifying exams. The course meets once/week for 2-1/2 to 3 hours. Depending on class size and on a rotating basis, groups of two or three students lead discussions of selected topics. Presenting students are required to prepare written reviews to focus the discussion. The bulk of class time is devoted to open discussion and critical analysis of the literature under consideration, and constructive criticism of student reviews. Each student develops and presents a research proposal on one of the topics discussed. Students taking the course for 2 credits will not be required to prepare the research proposal. and research plans. Grading is based on written reviews, quality of presentations, and class participation (all students) and on the quality of the research outline (3 credit).

    Course Coordinator: Jon Goguen

    Course Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Introduction to Flow & Image Cytometry | BBS 832a

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    The emphasis of the course will be an introduction to the practical aspects of Flow and Image Cytometry. As the majority of the GSBS graduates will either rely on or be exposed to data generated from Flow and Image Cytometry, the course will enhance their understanding of the technology, instrumentation skills, applications and interpretation of data. This course will be a hands on, lab-based program emphasizing on Flow and Image Cytometry instrumentation, components, cell sample staining procedures for immunophenotyping, DNA analysis and Image analysis. Students will participate in polychromatic Flow and Image Cytometry experiments and will progress from flow Cytometry analysis to cell sorting.

    Course Coordinator: Richard Konz

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2013

  • Introduction to Flow & Image Cytometry | BBS 832b

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    The emphasis of the course will be an introduction to the practical aspects of Flow and Image Cytometry. As the majority of the GSBS graduates will either rely on or be exposed to data generated from Flow and Image Cytometry, the course will enhance their understanding of the technology, applications and interpretation of data. The course will as well incorporate guest lectures from leaders I the field. Part one will consist of lectures discussing theory, optics, fluorescence characteristics and instrumentation. Part two will progress to cell sorting, complimentary technology such as Confocal microscopy and advanced applications which rely on these novel technologies.

    Course Coodinator: Richard Konz

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2013

  • Immunology & Virology Graduate Student Seminars | BBS 833

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Advanced IVP graduate students present seminars on their thesis research.

    Course Coordinator: Eric Huseby

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Immunobiology and Virology Spring Seminar Series | BBS 834

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    Leading researchers present a weekly seminar on a basic or clinical immunology and virology topic. Prior to the seminar, students read papers suggested by the seminar speaker and discuss the papers in class. Following the seminar, graduate students meet with the speaker for a discussion of the formal seminar. This course surveys the most important areas of basic and clinical immunology and virology including, but not limited to, antigen presentation; gene rearrangements; and expression of the genes for antigen receptors, immune tolerance, cytokines, immune cell development, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases, human immune system malignancies and immune response to infectious agents such as viruses, parasites and bacteria.

    Course Coordinator: Francis Chan

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: 

  • Immunology/Virology Summer Tutorial | BBS 846

    Programs: Immunology & Microbiology

    This course is designed to help first-year students prepare for the IMP advanced topics courses in the fall, learn how to think critically about articles, and meet senior students in the program. Students in the class will read one primary and one review paper the week before each class. The topic, paper, and review will be chosen by two student mentors. In a brief presentation; the mentors will describe the current state of the field and summarize the review. The class will then discuss the chosen article and critically analyze the positives and negatives of techniques, systems, conclusions, etc.

    Course Coordinator: Neal Silverman

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Summer 2016

  • Laboratory Rotation | BBS 850

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project, gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research.

    Course Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Taught every Fall and Spring semester

  • Laboratory Rotation | BBS 851

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project, gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research, acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research, and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research.

    Course Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every Summer

  • BBS Qualifying Exam | BBS 860

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students are required to register for this course in the fall semester of the academic year in which they are to pass their Qualifying Examination.

    Course Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every year 

  • BBS TRAC Meeting | BBS 865

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    All Graduate Students are required to have at least one TRAC meeting each academic year. After passing their Qualifying Examination and selection of their TRAC, students are required to register for this course each fall semester until their Dissertation Advisory Committee is formed.

    Course Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • Pre-Qualifying Research | BBS 870

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course is for students who have selected a Program and Thesis Advisor but who have not yet passed their Qualifying Examination.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Thesis Research | BBS 900

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students register for Thesis Research fall term of year three of the program, after passing the Qualifying Exam.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Graduate Research | BBS 990

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students register for Graduate Research fall term of year four in the PhD Program and will continue to register each semester until they complete all remaining requirements.

    Course Coordinator: Student's Thesis Advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Infectious Disease Epidemiology | CTS 721

    Programs: Clinical & Population Health Research, Immunology & Microbiology, MS in Clinical Investigation

    This course is designed to provide a historical perspective on infectious disease epidemiology as a basis for understanding current global health research and programs aimed at disease control, elimination, eradication and extinction. A passing grade will be based on class participation, discussing required readings and a final written (take-home) report.

    Prerequisites: CTS605A or permission from Instructor

    Course Coordinator: Ann Moormann

    Semester Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

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