Cell Biology Program Courses

The courses listed below inlcude required courses of the core curriculum, research and milestone courses, as well as program specific advanced topics, seminars, journal clubs and tutorials for specialization in Cell Biology.

  • Professionalism and Research Conduct (PARC) | BBS 601

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, MD/PhD, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This is a required course for all third year Basic Sciences students and all MD/PhD students entering doctoral study but who are not on the CPHR track. The PARC course helps to center our students in areas that are foundational to success in research: responsible data management; management of intellectual property; the ethical use of research subjects; recognizing and resolving conflicts of interest, professionalism in peer review and publishing; engaging mentors; and career exploration and planning. The PARC course comprises faculty-led presentations and small group discussions with case studies and workshop material. An online learning module (CITI training program comprising many case studies) is also included and must be completed before the end of the fall semester. Students required to take the fall PARC course will be block-registered. 

    Coordinator: Anthony Carruthers

    Semester Offered: Fall 

    Last Taught: Fall 2016

  • Communicating Science | BBS 602

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course seeks to help prospective scientists in the biological and medical sciences communicate their work effectively, in writing, graphics, and oral presentations. The course teaches how to prepare a research paper using words, statistics, and figures; how to present science to a lay audience; how to write a grant proposal; and how to present orally to scientific peers.

    Coordinator: Anthony Carruthers

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every fall

  • Foundations in Biomedical Science | BBS 614

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Pathway to Graduate Study, Translational Science

    This problem-based course provides learning opportunities through exploration of multidisciplinary areas of contemporary biomedical research, and creates a forum for practice in the skills required for research.

    Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2016

  • Using Animals in Biomedical Research | BBS 701

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Translational Science

    It is to the benefit of both science and animals to have a formal understanding of animal needs and animal use in the research environment. The goal of this course is to provide a sufficient appreciation of laboratory animal biology, care, and use to engender better science and enhanced animal welfare. Topics include controversies surrounding animal use in research; choosing an animal model; the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee; normative biology of rodent and non-rodent laboratory animals; diseases and other stressors and their effects on research; humane experimental endpoints and pain and its alleviation. There are also two laboratory sessions.

    Coordinator: Jerald Silverman

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2016

  • Cancer Biology | BBS 725

    Programs: Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    This course will provide students with a rigorous and comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that will underlie the genesis and progression of human cancers. It will build on the basic science knowledge acquired in the core curriculum and appreciation of the cancer as a disease obtained from the Tumor Pathology course. The salient topics to be covered include stem cells; oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes; tumor-host interactions, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. A major theme of the course will be to integrate the biology of cancer with the clinical behavior of tumors.

    Course Coordinator: Arthur Mercurio

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Principles of Light and Electron Microscopy | BBS 732

    Programs: Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary

    Principles and application of microscopy in biomedical research for graduate students at all levels. Demonstrations and laboratory exercises will be incorporated into some of the blocks of the instruction. This course is designed to teach the biologist how microscopes work and how to optimize image quality.

    Course Coordinator: Greenfield Sluder

    Semester Offered: Spring, odd years

    Last Taught: Spring 2015

  • Nuclear Structure & Function in Disease | BBS 734

    Programs: Cell Biology

    This course covers the relationship of nuclear and chromatin structure to gene function and regulation. Topics will be chosen from the recent research literature to illustrate molecular and cellular aspects of nuclear organization and regulation and how defects contribute to human disease. The format includes student presentations and faculty-students discussions of selected research papers. 

    Course Coordinator: Anthony Imbalzano

    Semester Offered: Spring, even years

    Last taught: Has not been taught within last two years

  • Human Genetics | BBS 736

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Translational Science

    This course focuses on the human genetic knowledge and concepts that underlie almost every aspect of human health, both in normal function and disease. We will cover chromosomal, single gene, and multifactorial disorders, including quantitative analysis of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, human cancer genetics, and recent developments in human genome research. Problem solving will involve clinical, molecular and statistical data. We hope to provide a framework for understanding a fast growing and highly technical field, and an appreciation of how current research impacts many aspects of medicine as well as biomedical research. This course follows the Medical School calendar; check with course coordinator regarding class schedule. 

    Course Coordinator: John Landers

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Fall 2015

  • Mammalian Development and Stem Cells | BBS 737

    Programs: Cell Biology

    The potential of stem cells in therapeutic applications has ignited a fiercely competitive field of research aimed at the isolation, maintenance and differentiation of stem cells into specific pathways of differentiation. The use of stem cells in clinical application, however, requires an understanding of the molecular and cellular and epigenetic events that transform pluripotent cells into differentiated ones. Mammalian embryogenesis can be conceived as a sequence of developmental decisions that result in progressive restriction in cell potency. Because all the cells of a future individual are derived from a single cell, the zygote, the differences between cell types are due to epigenetic events established as the embryo develops. The process for generating these epigenetic marks is equally important for embryogenesis as well as for stem cell research. In this course we will use the cellular and molecular mechanisms of mammalian development as a framework for understanding the origin and differentiation of multiple pluripotent cells and their role in stem cell research and human disease.

    Course Coordinator: Jamie Rivera

    Semester Offered: Fall, even years

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within last two years

  • Disruption of Cellular Architecture and Human Disease | BBS 788

    Programs: Cell Biology

    This course explores the relationships between basic cellular structures, components and processes, from the membrane through the cytoplasm and into the nucleus, and human diseases. Topics will be chosen from the recent literature to illustrate molecular and cellular aspects of cellular architecture and how defects contribute to disease. The format includes introductions by faculty, student presentations and faculty-student discussions of selected research papers. Topically, this course covers diseases ranging from ciliopathies, cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophies, mental retardation, dementia, hematopoietic diseases to cancer and aging. 

    Course Coordinator: Hong Zhang

    Course Offered: Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within last two years

  • Seminar in Cell Biology | BBS 811

    Programs: Cell Biology

    Seminar series in Developmental, Cell and Molecular Biology.

    Course Coordinator: Anthony Imbalzano

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Has not been taught within past two years

  • Laboratory Rotation | BBS 850

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project; gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research; acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research; and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research. 

    Course Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

    Last Taught: Taught every Fall and Spring semester

  • Laboratory Rotation | BBS 851

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Laboratory rotations are defined periods of research experience under the direction of a faculty member. They are intended to familiarize the student with concepts and techniques in several areas of research and to assist the student in evaluating research laboratories and projects that might be developed into a dissertation project. The student will participate in an ongoing research project; gain familiarity with concepts underlying the research; acquire a working knowledge of techniques used in the research; and write a report and present an oral summary of the results of the research. 

    Course Coordinator: Faculty member in whose lab student is working

    Semester Offered: Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every Summer

  • BBS Qualifying Exam | BBS 860

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students are required to register for this course in the fall semester of the academic year in which they are to pass their Qualifying Examination.

    Course Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every year 

  • BBS TRAC Meeting | BBS 865

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    All graduate students are required to have at least one Thesis Research Advisory Committee (TRAC) meeting each academic year. After passing their Qualifying Examination and selection of their TRAC, students are required to register for this course each fall semester until their Dissertation Advisory Committee is formed. 

    Course Coordinator: Mary Ellen Lane

    Semester Offered: Fall

    Last Taught: Taught every year

  • Prequalifying Research | BBS 870

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    This course is for students who have selected a program and thesis advisor but who have not yet passed the Qualifying Examination. 

    Course Coordinator: Student's thesis advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Thesis Research | BBS 900

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students register for Thesis Research fall term of year three of the program, after passing the Qualifying Exam.

    Course Coordinator: Student's thesis advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

  • Graduate Research | BBS 990

    Programs: Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Cancer Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology & Microbiology, Interdisciplinary, Neuroscience, Translational Science

    Students register for Graduate Research fall term of year four in the PhD Program and will continue to register each semester until they complete all remaining requirements.

    Course Coordinator: Student's thesis advisor

    Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Last Taught: Taught every semester

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